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cindy crawford richard gere

Cindy Crawford interviews actor and boyfriend Richard Gere at the Gianni Versace AIDS Benefit in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 11
Title: Best Of Edition
Original Airdate: 11/28/91
Includes segments from:

  • Cindy Hangs Out With Will Smith On The Set Of Fresh Prince (Episode 6)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Gianni Versace AIDS Fundraiser (Episode 7)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Cindy Crawford's 1991 Calendar Shoot (Episode 8 )
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

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jean paul gaultier

Designer Jean Paul Gaultier at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 12
Title: Paris Edition
Original Airdate: 12/18/91
Appearances: Jean Paul Gaultier, Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, Karl Lagerfeld, Ellen Von Unwerth

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: JEAN PAUL GAULTIER IS AN ICON

From his TV interviews last fall with Lady Gaga to his current role as creative director of Diet Coke, few designers have become pop culture icons quite like Jean Paul Gaultier. It’s a marvel that the platinum-tressed couturier, who blazed onto the fashion scene in the '70s (he apprenticed under Pierre Cardin, launched his first prêt-à-porter collection in 1976 and went onto couture in 1999), has retained relevance and notoriety as the enfant terrible of the French fashion industry for over 30 years. In 1985, he introduced sharply cut, midi-length skirt suits for men; in the ’90s, he famously created the cone bra for Madonna’s Blonde Ambition tour. This year, the two tow-headed stars have joined forces again: Gaultier outfitted her Madgesty for the MDNA world tour.

In this segment, Cindy goes to Paris to discuss taboo, the origin of Gaultier's fixation with corsetry and his reasons for making gender-bending fashion. Jean Paul Gaultier is honest and affable with zero pretension and it’s easy to see why, all these decades later there’s still joy to be found in Gaultier’s designs. It's unsurprising that new and exciting talents like Gaga still clamor to work with him.

+ WATCH JEAN PAUL GAULTIER


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: LINDA EVANGELISTA

linda evangelista

Model Linda Evangelista in Chanel at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Maybe it’s because it’s the Paris fashion episode, or because it’s a couple of years after our first supermodel interview, but Linda is the first model we speak to who has a firm grasp on how famous she is. Also, it strikes me that she speaks in technical terms regarding her work not unlike an actor talking to James Lipton on Inside The Actor’s Studio. Linda always wanted to be a model, even as a child, and in this segment she makes the interesting claim that models—especially the supermodels of the time—are like actresses, except that they are captured in still images rather than moving pictures. It should also be noted that the distinction is important—some would go on to pursue successful acting careers and others would have more trouble with dialogue.

During the ’90s, as the names of models, photographers and even fashion editors became more well-known, the magazine cover was the domain of the model, and not of the actress, as it is these days. Linda cites her versatility as a reason she’s such a cover and ad campaign mainstay. Legendary photographer Steven Meisel (in a rare on camera interview) confirms this assessment, and praises how completely she immerses herself in each character. We see that a change in hair color and clothes alters her look drastically. Linda also says that her mercurial appearance makes up for her lack of “All-American appeal” since she doesn't have the “button nose” or the “wheat-colored hair” that was so popular when she was growing up in Ontario, Canada. It's funny because it never occurred to me that looking like Linda Evangelista could ever be a crutch. Especially in Ontario, Canada. JKJKJKJK.

+ WATCH LINDA EVANGELISTA


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: PARIS FASHION WEEK

paris fashion week

Model Naomi Campbell in hair and makeup backstage at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

We're backstage again, this time to unveil the secrets of Paris Fashion Week. There's a tangle of cameras jockeying for position on the press risers, and the close quarters reveal crews of models in various stages of preparation. Cindy dubs it as “glamorous as a supermarket sale,” and breaks down the math of how much the event costs: the invitations to “1800 fashion editors and 600 buyers in 42 countries,” the ushers, the location, the presents and, of course, the models. A single show can set a designer back $150,000, and the top-grossing girl can make upwards of $5,000 per show (this is, of course, in 1991 dollars and only an indication as to how much designers spend now). Christy Turlington justifies the math thusly: “When you look at it in terms of business and how much money we’re bringing in for companies, I think that our couple of thousand dollars are meager.” Karl Lagerfeld agrees: “They are the image-making persons of today," he says. "They are like the goddesses of the silent screen.”

Backstage, models are crammed beside racks, and everyone is smoking. On the runway for Spring 1992, we see frou-frou lace dusters for the pin-up, campy lingerie look. This is the year Chanel showed staid, predictable, box-suit silhouettes, but in cheeky pastel terry cloth. It’s also the season of Herve Leger’s first show. Michael Hutchence of INXS describes the prepping for such pageantry as “a hundred women getting ready for dinner—it’s terrifying.”

+ WATCH BACKSTAGE AT PARIS FASHION WEEK


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: ELLEN VON UNWERTH'S 'ITALIAN VOGUE' SHOOT

ellen von unwerth

Photographer Ellen Von Unwerth in 1991.
Photo: MTV

This is a beautiful, fun segment that illustrates at several points, the difference between a fashion editorial with actresses and one case with models. If you’ve ever been on-set for a celebrity fashion shoot, you can immediately see the difference. Models know what they look like. If you’ve ever seen America’s Next Top Model, you’ll know how challenging it is for a subject to look fantastic, while engaging in an activity and how critical it is to be able to command body language and facial expressions according to the demands of the photographer. It's in intuition, experience and anticipating that shutter snap. Here Karen Mulder plays a raven-haired Jane Russell and Eva Herzigova plays Marilyn Monroe. They romp around in cars, lounge in a hotel room, and pose with loads of cigarettes. The models are in their element.

Ellen's easy way with models may stem from her starting her career as one. A burgeoning interest in photography led to a campaign with British designer Katharine Hamnett. Ellen is generally considered one of the most dynamic photographers in the fashion industry (both then and now), and it’s fascinating to see how relaxed and personable she is behind the camera. She smiles a lot and her instructions are either casually gestured or a single word left open for interpretation (like "flamenco"), and you can see why, when you’re half naked on a set or in public, Ellen’s style might be confidence building. It’s also what gives Ellen Von Unwerth’s photographs an immensely voyeuristic appeal. She lets the actions run while she chooses what to capture. The end result is often like a scene from a movie, and this Italian Vogue spread that's inspired by the movie Gentlemen Prefer Blondes may be stylized in costume but appears totally spontaneous.

+ WATCH ELLEN VON UNWERTH


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 12

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walk like a runway model

A participant walks like a runway model at a New Jersey mall in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 4 Episode: 13
Title: Winter '92
Original Airdate: 2/26/92
Appearances: Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, Iman

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: LEARN HOW TO WALK LIKE A MODEL AT THE MALL

Unfurling a length of red carpet on the main floor of the Garden State Plaza Mall to teach shoppers how to “Walk Like a Supermodel” seems hokey, but you have to remember that this was back when girls were getting ripped off by fake modeling classes and sham photographers offering to take your head-shots for hundreds of dollars. It also predates the thousands of instructional videos and years of runway footage that we all now have at our fingertips on YouTube and happily take for granted. I’m not saying that this segment would’ve incited a quickening of spirit to the extent that some kid from Bumblefudgeville would have seen this and immediately thought, “Hey, wait a second, I can do that!” and then grow up to be Coco Rocha. I’m just saying that, were you thinking of pursuing modeling, it might be nice to hear the poised and gorgeous Christy Turlington talk about how angry she looked when she walked because she was nervous. Plus, there’s this great moment where you get to see how Naomi switches up her style each season, starting back when she was a wee n00b. We also get a priceless sit-down with the incomparable Iman, who has no idea what “learning to walk” implies. It’s a non-issue for her, because it’s all in the “presence.” Cue footage of Iman positively gliding down the runway in billowing Calvin Klein. It’s true: some people are born with it. Others are clearly space-alien paragons of perfection grown from spores and sent to marry other such stunning creatures named David Bowie. The rest of us have to learn in a mall.

Hitting the marble floor of a Jersey shopping center is just one of many ways in which Cindy Crawford shows she’s a mensch. Not only does she twirl and personably teach a bunch of random normalfolk how to do what she does, she even brings out Ellen Harth, President of Elite Runway, for further instruction. There are a pile of heels, a kid who’s a dead ringer for a young Eric Stoltz and even a darling proto-Glambert punk rock kid with a grip of wallet chains, who sells the bejesus out of his leather jacket by mimicking CC, and flinging it over his shoulders on his twirl. (Cindy is wearing a moto jacket, too. Though hers is much fancier. Naturally.)

+ WATCH WALK LIKE A SUPERMODEL


STREET STYLE: DYED DENIM FROM VERSACE TO CROSS COLOURS

colored denim

Colored denim for men by Moschino Jeans in 1992.
Photo: MTV

A piece on colored denim is the series’s first segment targeted towards men, and it does a surprising amount of heavy lifting. First of all, it cements the show as a fashion authority by granting dudes permission to wear something as adventurous as dyed jeans. It’s a fairly big deal considering how everyone wore pale blue dad jeans and faded black jeans at the time. I equate it to that moment when kids who listened to rap or skated understood that they had the go-ahead to wear tight pants despite the initial derision they'd experience. The styling is fantastic. Even though the models are very model-ish, with very model-looking hair and hyper-expressive mannerisms that make Delia’s catalog girls look natural (I have no idea why they are eating pie with their hands at the store), but the segment is laudable for its instructional elements. It basically teaches you how to style a bunch of looks. Some are great and some are comedy gold.

First of all, you have a Canadian Tuxedo (denim jacket plus jeans, a.k.a. a Texas Tux) with denim in two different, hyper-saturated colors. Then you have overalls that are fitted and cuffed, with boots and a printed button-up shirt (cloud print is huge at this point) that feels very Trad skinhead (not the racist kind). Then, you’ve got Cross Colours, which evokes all the very best memories, from TLC’s “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg” video to “What About Your Friends” and those ads from Dr. Dre and Snoop, many of which you can revisit on Tumblr. Sure, again, that one model guy in the shoot looks awkward, but Carl Jones, designer for Cross Colours, puts it beautifully: “Colored denim is something new. Clothing without prejudice. It also means colors without prejudice, to show something new and to excite men about fashion. We try to design in a way where, if a kid has $20, he could afford something.” This is why absolutely everyone (and their dads) owned a CC baseball cap, but it also allowed men to peacock with the comfort of a silhouette they already owned and a brand that was cosigned by the music industry. And then to show the trends as interpreted by the high-fashion brands, we go into Versace denim for the skinny fit, the op art swirls, the Betty Boop print and all the other detailing that I would pillage all of eBay for.

+ WATCH COLORED DENIM


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 13

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cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford hangs out with actor Denis Leary in Hawaii in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 4 Episode: 14
Title: Swimsuit Edition
Original Airdate: 4/29/92
Appearances: Denis Leary, Niki Taylor

POP CULTURE AND FASHION: CINDY CRAWFORD DRAGS DENIS LEARY TO HAWAII

What's better than a throwing a cranky Denis Leary into the Hawaiian surf with Cindy Crawford? Getting a cranky—and pale—Denis Leary to hop into swim trunks, go boogie boarding (unsuccessfully) and then climb onstage with Don Ho to warble "Tiny Bubbles" to a crowd. This was waaaaay before Leary was in movies and the FX fireman drama Rescue Me, and just after he wrapped his three-year writing/acting gig at MTV's game show Remote Control, on which he played Keith Richards and Andy Warhol in a number of skits. Remote Control was the channel's first non-musical program, and launched the careers of comedians Colin Quinn and Adam Sandler.

This segment was clearly aimed at broadening the show's audience by enlisting the Boston comedian (who had, by that point, already deployed his high-speed ranting in MTV television commercials) to undertake touristy activities with our host. Leary might not have been so obliging a year later, when his stand-up album No Cure For Cancer came out and identified him with its signature song: "Asshole."

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD AND DENIS LEARY


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: NIKI TAYLOR'S 'VOGUE' SHOOT

niki taylor

Model Niki Taylor at her American 'Vogue' shoot in Miami in 1992.
Photo: MTV

If you were in high school in the early '90s, 16-year-old Niki Taylor was one of the more relatable models. Sure, we're on the set of her Vogue shoot, and of course she's tall, thin and blonde but at the time, Niki was still attending high school in Florida and aspired to be a marine biologist (not unlike every 16-year-old in 1992. Ed note: What was it with marine biology and the '90s?).

These days, it's entirely typical for coltish 13-year-olds to get plucked from obscurity from tiny Eastern European villages to travel the world with their moms, but with Niki, modeling was a hobby before it became a career. Even when adults like Vogue Fashion Editor Elizabeth Saltzman talk about how well Niki will do, provided she "doesn't get caught up in the fashion world," you have faith that Niki's sweetness will keep her on the straight and narrow. This is our most young and American (and in some ways the most reality TV-like) segment so far.

I remember adoring Niki, a familiar face in a slew of teen magazines even if she was a little milquetoast for models back then. She just seemed like a lovely girl with good genes and after her younger sister Krissy joined the modeling fold and was just as pretty and humble, I enjoyed seeing them walk and do shoots together. It was shocking when 17-year-old Krissy overdosed on an asthma inhaler and died from complications due to what was discovered to be a rare heart condition on July 5, 1995. There were multiple news stories on the side effects of over-the-counter medications containing epinephrine and it was tragic and scary that a life was cut short not by drugs or reckless behavior but by something that could've happened to anyone. It was just another way–a terrible way–that these girls were so relatable.

+ WATCH NIKI TAYLOR FOR 'VOGUE'


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 14

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beastie boys

Mike D and King Ad-Rock of the Beastie Boys in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 4 Episode: 15
Title: Summer '92
Original Airdate: 6/17/92
Appearances: Mike D and King Ad-Rock (The Beastie Boys)

STREET STYLE: BEASTIE BOYS AND THE X-LARGE STORE

Founded in 1991, X-Large was a monster on the streetwear scene. The brand had flagship stores on Vermont Street in Los Angeles and on Lafayette in Manhattan (now shuttered), and were considered the originator of the ape logo despite BAPE being super famous for theirs. It’s also known as The Beastie Boys' store because Mike D was one of the original founders. His role evolved throughout the years but the any ideas that the brand was just a Beastie Boys vanity project unfairly marginalizes co-founders and designers Eli Bonerz and his college pal Adam Silverman. That the X-Large brand continues to exist is a testament to how strongly the store and their business philosophy resonated with kids at the time. (X-Girl, Kim Gordon's sister-store venture, would come a couple of years later.)

In this clip, Mike D and Ad-Rock talk about the fashion of "anti-fashion" and about championing deadstock sneaker classics, baggy pants and what "some people would call... a T-shirt." It's a cheeky swipe at the fashion establishment, but more important, it's a view into the streetwear world. Ad-Rock and Mike D go into extreme detail to show off graphics on tees and features on pants. The whole segment predates the limited-edition streetwear mania that would entrance the youth of both coasts, who'd then spend nights sleeping in front of stores for select apparel and shoes. Plus, it was heartening to consider that kids who looked and spoke like stoop-sitting, parking lot-inhabiting, rap-listening derelicts could create a viable commercial venture based on the philosophy of selling what they wanted to wear. There's a great interview with Eli talking about the early days here.

Another reason the X-Large L.A. store was important is because it's where the Menace skate crew hung out. Billy Valdes, the kid who talks about baggy pants in this piece, was a member of the ragtag team led by Kareem Campbell, who had deep ties within the established skate community, but sponsored a motley bunch through Menace. For more, watch this amazing "Epicly Latered" about Menace on Vice.

There's also a great Big Brother interview with Billy (who you may also recognize as Stanly from Kids).

Though X-Large was a store, a brand, and a logo championed by Mike D on every international Beastie Boys tour, it was also, in the classic sense of a downtown store, very much a clubhouse where kids with common interests met up and hung out. Two years after the opening, in 1994, Supreme would open their store on Lafayette on the same side of the street cementing the area as a cool-guy loitering zone. And while X-Large still exists, the legacy of its early days serve as a call to arms throughout the decade and the one after for every hypebeast with a laptop to start a graphic tee line.

+ THE BEASTIE BOYS AND X-LARGE


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: CINDY CRAWFORD AS A PEPSI SPOKESMODEL

cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford on the set of her Pepsi commercial shoot in 1992.
Photo: MTV

The Cola Wars were raging. Pepsi was the "Choice of a New Generation" and “New Coke” had been rebranded Coca-Cola II. We're on set with the newly appointed Pepsi spokesmodel, Cindy Crawford, to shoot a series of soon-to-be-iconic TV commercials with director Joe Pytka. It's a grueling process with multiple outfit changes (a skintight white dress is deemed too racy because it's see-through), and Cindy is professional and patient despite the director's reputed disdain for models: “He's been known to call models Bim and Bo," she says. "He goes, 'Yo, Bim; Bo, get over here.'”

The spots feature Cindy in various situations, but the most memorable is the spot that aired during the 1992 Super Bowl. In every advertisement on the four-day shoot, Cindy is treated like a movie star, and if she wasn't already considered a national icon, this certainly cemented her popularity with the 79.6 millions of people who watched the Super Bowl that year.

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 15

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liv tyler

Model Liv Tyler goes back to school shopping at Stussy in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 4 Episode: 16
Title: Fall '92
Original Airdate: 9/16/92
Appearances: Liv Tyler, Todd Oldham, Veronica Webb, Tyra Banks

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: BACK-TO-SCHOOL SHOPPING WITH MODEL LIV TYLER

In this clip, we've got Liv Tyler, who had just started her modeling career six months prior, taking us back-to-school shopping BECAUSE SHE IS IN THE 9TH GRADE. The daughter of rock n' roll royalty (her dad is Aerosmith's Steven Tyler, who some of you babies will only know as the dude who used to be an American Idol judge) is basically a zygote here and it's adorable because we've given her $200 to go shopping and she manages to find several outfits even though H&M and Forever 21 didn't exist yet.

I love how easygoing she is in her crossbody bag, simple black shorts and clogs and we make a beeline for Stussy where she tries on a bunch of oversized, striped tees, bucket hats (LOL) and stove pipe denim knee shorts (LOLOL). Then it's off to John Fluevog to try on some shoes and the Army Navy store for some basics like white tees. There's also a trip to vintage store Reminiscence (that still exists in the flatiron district!) and all the footage is interspersed with B-roll of Liv onset of a fashion shoot where her bangs are blown out and she wears velvet headbands and satin gloves because it is 1992.

Once all the booty is collected, she cooks up some outfits together and we learn that this beautiful girl who would become a cosmetics spokesperson and actress loves everything super hip-hop like oversized everything, backwards caps, Stan Smith adidas sneakers and gold. She also puts together a school girl look with a midriff-bearing tied-up white blouse, plaid skirt and white tights that's very reminiscent of her appearance in her dad's "Crazy" video two years later as well as a super-weird-but-awesome houndstooth-overall-midi-skirt-tunic thing that she wears with a white tee.

It's like going shopping with a mortal, human, unfamous friend, which is what makes it and her so great.

+ WATCH LIV TYLER GOES SHOPPING


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: TODD OLDHAM REDECORATES HIS HOME AND DESIGNS A COLLECTION

todd oldham

Todd Oldham refurbishes his house on a budget in 1992.
Photo: MTV

In this segment, we learn how a designer’s mind works: In redecorating his home, Todd came up with the “Interiors” theme of his Fall 1992 collection. It’s delightful to see how the fringe trim of decorative pillows becomes tiers on a mini skirt for a very young Tyra Banks; striped carpets are re-imagined as psychedelic pantsuits for Veronica Webb; two "junky" (his words, not ours!) paintings that hang on Todd’s walls become the front and back of a skirt, complete with borders that evoke the paintings’ frames. There is a leopard-print fur chaise (faux, since Todd loves animals) that becomes a luxurious, long coat as well as a printed blouse. Todd’s search for a gilt mirror becomes the inspiration for a sequin shift dress.

Then, Todd hits the flea market with Angel, his design assistant. In the same breezy, organic way we saw Todd creating his “furniture fashion,” he picks up a couch, a chair and an end table and remixes them in mere hours with the help of fabric remnants, a glue gun, safety pins, spray paint, permanent fabric dye, markers, bits of porcelain and roofing nails.

It all looks pretty ’90s (see: painted swirls on a velvet chair), but it’s great to watch a celebrated designer not only walk you through his creative process and invite you into his brain and home, but then to have him show you in totally non-scary ways how to redecorate, employing what he calls “the cheesiest recover.” It's not intimidating at all. Even in a sped-up montage, you can see where Todd applies the glue, how he uses safety pins to create the hem of the sofa cover and how tucking all the excess fabric or cutting it away makes for a surprisingly effective workaround in place of using a sewing machine. Todd also talks about the importance of recycling, which is another element that makes Todd’s design philosophy so accessible. (That said, these days, I’d have everything closely checked for bedbugs.)

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM APARTMENT IMPROVEMENTS


BEST AND WORST OF THE RUNWAY: CONTEXTUALIZING FALL/WINTER 1992

gianni versace

Gianni Versace runway show in 1992.
Photo: MTV

This is a montage of the trends at fashion week for FW 1992. There’s teased and tormented hair at Martine Sitbon, fantastic millinery at Complice (designed then by Dolce and Gabbana), ’70s rock-n-roll badassery at Dolce and Gabbana and Anna Sui, and animal print at Todd Oldham and Perry Ellis. We also get a shy, cross-dressing model at Todd Oldham, and neon, body-con mastery at Gianni Versace.

+ WATCH 1992 FALL FASHION WEEK


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: MEDIA AND EATING DISORDERS

Since it was a television show targeted predominantly to young girls that covered fashion and beauty, House of Style was conscious about addressing the topic of eating disorders. In this segment, we speak to Linda Wells, EIC of Allure magazine; eating disorder specialist Dr. Ivy Marcus; and physician Woodson Merrell. Most importantly, we meet a teen and learn about her battle with bulimia. Like the testimonial-based coverage of women’s health issues in magazines like Sassy, these moments of candor were intended to resonate with kids watching the show who may identify with the anecdotes and emotions, and to help viewers recognize that they might need to seek help.

+ WATCH FASHION MEDIA AND EATING DISORDERS


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 16

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cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford at the American 'Vogue' shoot with photographer Helmut Newton in Monte Carlo in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 4 Episode: 17
Title: Best Of Edition
Original Airdate: 10/28/92
Includes segments from:

  • Cindy Crawford's Vogue Shoot With Helmut Newton In Monte Carlo (Episode 10)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Photographer Ellen Von Unwerth (Episode 12)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Niki Taylor's Vogue Shoot In Miami (Episode 14)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

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dolce and gabbana

Cindy Crawford and designer Domenico Dolce at Cindy's model fitting during Milan Fashion Week in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 4 Episode: 18
Title: Milan Edition
Original Airdate: 12/16/92
Appearances: Stefano Gabbana, Domenico Dolce, Linda Evangelista, Madonna, Naomi Campbell, Kristen McMenamy, Mario Testino, Stephen Sprouse, Kevyn Aucoin

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: CINDY GOES TO A DOLCE & GABBANA FITTING

We’re in Milan to see what goes into a model fitting there. Cindy tries on Dolce & Gabbana’s Spring ’93 collection, and the Italian duo feature more of the long, lean, lithe, Brit-rock-gone-hippie looks that were popular that season. We're talking floppy hats, clogs, chunky heels, peasant blouses, maxi skirts, chokers, patchwork, and massive ’70s collars. There’s even a bit where the girls dress up in matching, shrunken mod suits like the Beatles in the early Brian Epstein years. Linda Evangelista, with her perfectly bobbed hair, plays John Lennon, and is slightly embarrassed by the prospect of fake-playing a guitar.

Cindy talks about the process: finding your rack, going through all the adjustments, having your Polaroid taken for reference so you know how the pieces go together and what accessories go where (this was the year, after all, when everyone wore gobs of necklaces, gold rings, massive cameos, hats, feathers and scarves) and how her assignment—number 11—sets her order in the show. She jokingly remarks that she’s been bumped down from having opened the show last year.

Cindy introduces us to Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, and then sits down with them as a journalist to discuss their inspiration for the season and their shared appreciation of breasts—their favorite body part on a lady. It’s amusing to note that Carla Bruni is wearing a replica of the Queen’s crown given that she’s since been First Lady of France. But it’s a beret-wearing Madonna, with overly plucked eyebrows and perfectly in-sync circle Lennon glasses, jumping onstage for the encore that steals the show. Asked about her presence, Madge simply replies that she and the designers are friends. The collection is sprawling and stunning, and it’s lovely for us to see a runway show in the time before livestreaming and backstage cams from this many vantage points.

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD'S DOLCE AND GABBANA FITTING

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: NAOMI CAMPBELL WEARS ZIT CREAM

naomi campbell

Model Naomi Campbell in her hotel room at Milan Fashion Week in 1992.
Photo: MTV

We’re at Fashion Week after hours with Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista, and Kristen McMenamy. The three striking women are visibly fatigued after a long day of fittings and shows, and we get a genuine, loopy vibe from them that gives this behind-the-scenes footage a sense of honesty. They’re just too beat to put up veils. Not that Naomi has ever had any problems being herself, but seeing three supermodels sitting on the floor of a hotel bathroom (a very nice hotel bathroom, mind you) holding up chicken cutlet boob inserts and commenting about their lack of “tits” is remarkably engaging.

After Linda goes home, Kristen and Naomi play dress-up. Naomi puts on a dress that cost her $15 with a $10 poncho. Kristen models a number of her characteristically gothy black dresses, and then Naomi shows off her one-of-a-kind purple suede Anna Sui ensemble. Kristen leaves (only after jumping all over Naomi’s enormous bed), and then Naomi begins her nighttime ablutions. She’s wearing an oversized tie-dyed tee as she washes her face and exfoliates. It’s an intimate, memorable moment not only because she muses about her future husband, but also because, when she’s traded all her pretty togs for a night shirt and no makeup, she looks very much the young girl that she is. Then she does something awesome: Without any self-consciousness about being on national television, she applies zit cream to her face with a Q-Tip: “I’ve got zits so I’m going to put my spots cream on and I don’t care. Everybody has zits.” It’s humanizing and feels impossibly far away from the Naomi we know today, what with the phone-throwing tantrums and diva behavior.

+ WATCH NAOMI CAMPBELL AT FASHION WEEK

STREET STYLE: MARIO TESTINO'S STREET PHOTOGRAPHY

mario testino

Photographer Mario Testino goes on a rainy day photo shoot in Milan in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Street photography is nothing new now, what with the proliferation of work from Scott Schuman (The Sartorialist) and Tommy Ton (Jak & Jil) and every subsequent riff on the theme, but it’s interesting to see how legendary fashion photographer Mario Testino shot scenes from Milan. First of all, we can’t neglect to mention how beautifully dressed the photographer is, in an impeccably layered, unmistakably Italian ensemble: French cuffs, a jolt of color in his cardigan, a tartan umbrella and a navy blazer with an ASCOT. It’s everything you’d see in a GQ gallery of the Italian trade show Pitti Uomo today (though I appreciate that Pitti happens in Firenze).

Testino talks about how much he loves shooting architecture in black and white (accompanied by the requisite shots of the Duomo), but he also talks about how much he loves shooting details like messy electrical wiring above a storefront. The end results are unfussy and lovely. Testino describes how much he loves taking photos of children and older people when he’s shooting for pleasure, adding that older generations have all the style. It’s an admirable quirk for an artist renowned for capturing the most beautiful supermodels of the time, but he’s not alone in this sentiment. Check out Ari Seth Cohen’s Advanced Style blog, that features chic women in their 80s and 90s. It's fabulous... As is Mario’s admirably thick head of hair.

+ WATCH MARIO TESTINO IN MILAN

STREET STYLE: ARTIST STEPHEN SPROUSE RETURNS TO FASHION

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Designer Stephen Sprouse returns to fashion with a collection shot for 'Harper's Bazaar' in 1992.
Photo: MTV

On hiatus since December 1988, the artist, photographer and designer Stephen Sprouse returned to fashion with “CyberPunk,” a 32-piece capsule collection made exclusively for Bergdorf Goodman. After a shoulder injury forced a switch to shoes with Velcro fastenings and a commission from Axl Rose of Guns N’ Roses to create tour outfits, Sprouse decided to create a line of androgynous clothing that exclusively featured Velcro closures. To commemorate the occasion, the designer shot a fashion editorial for Harper’s Bazaar.

To give you a little background as to the significance of Sprouse’s return to fashion, you must first know that he was an important figure in the downtown New York scene. He made clothes for his neighbor Debbie Harry; he collaborated with Andy Warhol, creating prints with the artist’s camo silkscreens. Sprouse also worked with Keith Haring, who designed his signature “squibbles” for a number of garments in Sprouse’s 1983 collection. However, the younger generation may better remember Sprouse’s Day-Glo graffiti hand style from the 2008 Marc Jacobs Louis Vuitton ads shot by Terry Richardson, where the designer appears naked with a “defaced” LV monogram weekender hiding his privates. The 2008 collection of “It Bags” were actually an homage to the collaboration between Marc and Steven in 2000, before the artist passed away due to heart failure in 2004.

In a Harper’s Bazaar article in 2008, Jacobs said of Sprouse, “He had this desire to take what he saw in the streets and elevate it. He was using all this stuff that was so costly, really beautiful materials, and he was doing it all so beautifully. There are so many people who try to affect a street style, but it doesn't have the integrity. Stephen's work was so stylistic, and it had street cred.”

Sprouse abandoned fashion to focus on his art career, but resumed making clothes for two collections. CyberPunk’s least expensive piece was a pair of men’s undergarments that retailed for $500, but it’s the luxe ponchos, floor-length hooded tunics, military detailing and post-apocalyptic armor plating that are notable for their fit and dramatic flair: streetwear gone wildly couture.

+ WATCH STEPHEN SPROUSE FOR 'HARPER'S BAZAAR'

DEMOCRATIZING FASHION: LEARN HOW TO OVERPLUCK YOUR BROWS WITH KEVYN AUCOIN AND CAROL SHAW

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Makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin gives Christy Turlington perfectly plucked '90s eyebrows.
Photo: MTV

If you’ve never flipped through Kevyn’s books— The Art of Makeup, Making Faces and Face Forward, which show transformations of regular people into historical figures or turn Hollywood stars into… other Hollywood stars—you absolutely should. Before your favorite YouTube makeup artist showed off step-by-step instructions on how to turn herself into Jared Leto or Justin Bieber, there was Kevyn Aucoin (who died of organ failure, caused by an addiction to the prescription painkillers he took for a pituitary tumor), turning Martha Stewart into Veronica Lake and Christina Ricci into Edith Piaf. Kevyn had a featured column in Allure and was one of the most celebrated makeup artists of his day.

In this segment, Kevyn (along with makeup artist Carol Shaw) teaches us how to pluck our eyebrows. Or, rather, how to overpluck them, since this was the early ’90s, when a pencil-thin arch and a lip-lined pout were all the rage. It’s the video version of the magazine illustration that always told you to take a pencil and point it towards your nose and make sure your nostril and the fat part of the brow met at a certain angle. However, the best advice comes from Carol Shaw, who tells us to use a white nail pencil (a device that helped whiten French manicure tips—another beauty casualty of the decade) to mark where you wanted to pluck, and to use a stiff, angled brush and eyeshadow to fill in the brow and finish the look.

+ WATCH PERFECT EYEBROWS

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 18

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Model Kate Moss in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Season: 5 Episode: 19
Title: Winter Edition
Original Airdate: 1/21/93
Appearances: Kate Moss, Todd Oldham

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: KATE MOSS

Kate Moss’s arrival on the scene marks the fashion industry’s response to the grunge movement that dominated youth culture and music at the time. The doe-eyed British waif was notable not only because she was antithetical to the buxom, bodacious, big-haired glamour of the supermodels who came before, but because she stood at just 5’6”—a height that was widely considered undesirable in her line of work. The notable thing about Kate (and, of course, the passage of time and her relevance throughout the next decades would prove as much) is that she did not pave the way for a generation of shorter girls: Kate Moss was the exception and an outlier. Another effect of her stature within the industry is that she couldn’t typically be shot for campaigns and fashion editorial flanked by a pack of other girls. In any iconic “here are all the supermodels” round-up shot by Steven Meisel or the like, Moss would look odd, and was therefore frequently shot by herself, which only contributed to her air of vulnerability and her persona as a loner. The CK One group shot ads are obviously the exception, though it should be considered how stark the campaign is and how much the other models featured therein are similarly waifish and un-modelly.

Some argue that Kate Moss does not qualify as a supermodel (and the debate as to who coined the phrase and whether it stretches back far enough to include Lauren Hutton, or extends forward to members of later generations, like Gisele Bündchen still rages) but if you define the term based on money earned, status achieved, and impact, Kate absolutely qualifies. Her ascension represents a critical turning point and redefined ’90s beauty. She is the line between grunge and glamour. In this introductory segment, Kate smiles goofily, talks about how her shoulders are her best feature and how she didn’t get to hang out with Mark Wahlberg during the CK jeans shoot because his "posse" was there the entire time. She is also one of the few fledgling models who does not seem intimidated by any other models, established or otherwise.

+ WATCH KATE MOSS

DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: TODD OLDHAM TAKES US THRIFT SHOPPING

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Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham goes thrift store shopping in 1993.
Photo: MTV

As with the furniture in the earlier installment, Todd’s attitude is irreverent and inventive toward the clothes he thinks teens should be wearing. It’s reassuring once again that a world-renowned designer is giving kids the greenlight to shun brands and expensive gear; at one point, Todd even says that thrift-store finds could be considered analogous to couture because time has guaranteed that they’re one-of-a-kind. Todd suggests starting in the department that is your favorite, and looking for signs like empty hangers to see what others have “stashed” on the floor directly underneath. For the ladies, he suggests shopping in the men’s and little boys’ department and advises dudes to “paper bag” their pants and opt for a much larger waist size than they’d typically wear. A quick tutorial on “how to layer,” and why you shouldn’t be afraid to buy suits and discard the undesirable top or bottom ends the segment—but not before Todd instructs us to do our own alterations: Nobody cares if you screw up your own inexpensive stuff.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM GOES THRIFT SHOPPING

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: GRUNGE ON THE RUNWAY

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Highlights from the Spring 1993 runway shows.
Photo: MTV

The ’70s look is still going strong, with platforms, wedges, berets, crochet dusters, bell bottoms and hot pants. But there's a notable migration into grunge with beanies, loose jackets, Dr. Martens boots, teeny-tiny eyebrows and stripes aplenty. There is slouchy sleepwear at Perry Ellis by Marc Jacobs (SUCH A PIVOTAL COLLECTION!!!), straggly lank hair at Calvin Klein. Millinery is all over the place from gigantic velvet “Blossom” hats to a straw pith helmet contraption at Byron Lars that is highly evocative of the black “Darth Vader” visor shown for 2012 by Nicolas Ghesqueire for Balenciaga that retailed for a cool $3,000. Details, people, details.

+ WATCH SPRING '93 RUNWAY WRAP-UP

+ WATCH MODELS RELAX BACKSTAGE

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 19

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todd oldham

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham makes charitable Valentine's Day gifts in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Season: 5 Episode: 20
Title: Romance Edition
Original Airdate: 2/11/93
Appearances: Todd Oldham, Dave Pirner (Soul Asylum), Christian Slater, Naomi Campbell, Lucie de la Falaise, Kristen McMenamy, Anna Sui, Veronica Webb, Kevin Nealon

DEMOCRATIZING FASHION: TODD OLDHAM'S INEXPENSIVE AND SOCIALLY AWARE VALENTINE'S GIFTS

Todd Oldham wasn’t just about arts and crafts and baggy trousers; the designer was passionate about promoting a message. In this Valentine’s Day segment, he instructs us to make mixtapes and beaded flowers for our friends and loved ones—but not before giving love to his favorite charity, Paws and Powers, which helps homebound people with AIDS to keep and care for their pets. He makes a point of namedropping artist Patrick O’Connell for creating the iconic AIDS red ribbon, and advises us not to let a day go by without "honoring our sweethearts with AIDS." It’s a beautiful moment in a feature that could have skewed perfunctory and commercial and yet another reminder to MTV viewers to think of the thousands who died of the virus each year nationwide.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM'S VALENTINE'S GIFTS

POP CULTURE AND FASHION: STARS RECALL THEIR FIRST KISSES

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Model Naomi Campbell shares her first kiss story in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Dave Pirner (Soul Asylum [who was dating Winona Ryder at the time]), Rosie Perez, Dave Mustaine of Megadeth, Christian Slater, Richand and Chris Robinson (the Black Crowes), Naomi Campbell, Lucie de la Falaise, Kristen McMenamy, Anna Sui, Veronica Webb and actor Kevin Nealon talk about how awkward, uncomfortable and awesome their first kisses were. "I accidentally kissed a girl in the eye," remembers Nealon. "I think she got a stye after that."

+ WATCH CELEBS' FIRST KISSES

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 20

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Featured Comment

I love these two as a couple. What a festive way to celebrate two important events in their life. Mariah looks like a dream.

Posted by Journey on Mariah Carey And Nick Cannon Shut Down Disneyland To Renew Vows In Cinderella-Themed Ensembles
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