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cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford goes backstage to find out what models think of posing nude in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 31
Title: Swimsuit Edition
Original Airdate: 6/9/94
Appearances: Naomi Campbell, Kate Moss, Helena Christensen, Calvin Klein, Manon Rhéaume, Kim Gordon, Daisy Von Furth, Sofia Coppola, Spike Jonze

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: THE NUDITY DEBATE

Fashion is one thing, but for this segment House Of Style interviews Cindy Crawford, Amber Valletta, Shalom Harlow, Naomi Campbell, Kate Moss, Helena Christensen and Niki Taylor on the subject of modeling nothing: in other words, posing nude. Of the models, Niki is the only one who opts out of nudity entirely: “My body’s for my man.” Cindy talks about her decision to do Playboy because it exposes her to a new audience that may not read fashion magazines (but who obviously get Playboy for the articles). Kate talks about the appeal of her Obsession ads, with Calvin Klein chiming in to comment on the sensual nature of perfume and how challenging it can be to sell a feeling. He believes the Obsession ads are compelling not just for the nudity, but for the expression on Kate Moss’s face.

Many of the models agree that your relationship with the photographer — and the resulting level of confidence and comfort — is a huge part of why they’d choose to do nude campaigns or editorial; they appear genuinely confused about the backlash. A nude Allure cover image got the magazine banned in some parts of California, and Helena’s topless campaign for Express Jeans led to some store boycotts. Stephanie Seymour sizes up the experience best when she equates nude photos with getting a tattoo: It’s permanent, and can haunt you forever, so you have to take your time to do it right, make sure you’re protected and ensure that the photos are done in good taste.

DEMOCRATIZING FASHION: KEVIN MANCUSO'S HAIR TIPS

kevin mancuso

Summer hairstyles by hairstylist Kevin Mancuso in 1994.
Photo: MTV

To be a teen in the ’90s is to know what it’s like to have a ridiculous hairstyle (or a series of them). It was the era of tiny hair barrettes, over-complicated pigtails, white-girl dreads and French twists. In this how-to hair segment, we have celebrity stylist Kevin Mancuso (trusted stylist to Natalie Portman and Taylor Swift in Central Park, displaying the bemusing summer up-dos that were all the rage in 1994. One liberally employs brightly-colored pipe cleaners. Another involves tiny Björk-style rave twists piled on the crown of the head with ends hanging down to create a fringe. Then there’s the repeated teasing and spraying that felts sections of hair into loose dreadlocks. Finally, there’s a side-parted, gelled, sleek look, with a wee pompadour for a rock-hard coif.

+ WATCH KEVIN MANCUSO ON SUMMER HAIR

POP CULTURE AND FASHION: MANON RHÉAUME, THE FIRST LADY OF HOCKEY, MODELS

manon rheaume

Professional female hockey player Manon Rhéaume in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Applying what the boys of Dirt magazine did in their fashion editorial, here we use clothing to call attention to someone regular House of Style viewers may not be familiar with. Manon Rhéaume was the first lady of hockey. A Quebec native, she started skating at 3, and was the first woman to sign to a professional team in 1992 when she joined the Tampa Bay Lightning. She’s the OG Roller Derby Girl and famously turned down an offer to pose nude in Playboy. She also happens to be beautiful.

Here, Manon models Patricia Field and Antique Boutique on the ice. There are metallic jackets with leggings; tiny denim shorts and shrunken shirts; mini-skirts and pigtails. The infantilizing (or “kinderwhore”) trend that was huge in the ’90s is kinda a buzzkill, since Rhéaume’s strong and talented, and the costume changes are interspersed with interviews with her male teammates, talking about her incredible capability and athleticism. In one portion, Rhéaume’s skating around eating a soft-serve ice cream cone, and it looks sort of porn-y. But then she takes a spill and lands on her ass in the changing room, cracking up riotously over the splat of ice cream on the floor, which makes you fall right back in love with her.

+ WATCH MANON RHÉAUME

STREET STYLE: X-GIRL FASHION SHOW

sofia coppola spike jonze

Milkfed designer Sofia Coppola and video director Spike Jonze at the X-Girl streetwear fashion show in 1994.
Photo: MTV

X-Girl is the sister line to the X-Large brand, and to commemorate the launch of the collection designed by Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon and stylist Daisy von Furth, the crew throw a renegade fashion show on Wooster Street, across from Marc Jacobs’s show, produced by indie darlings Sofia Coppola and then-boyfriend Spike Jonze. It is an unspeakably cool gambit: There’s a white sheet spray painted with the logo strung up in the background, and a milling crowd comprised of the likes of Zoe Cassavetes, Donovan Leitch, Francis Ford Coppola, The Beastie Boys, J. Mascis of Dinosaur Jr., and My So-Called Life Christmas ghost Juliana Hatfield. Once the Marc Jacobs show lets out, Steven Meisel, Anna Sui, Bill Cunningham, Linda Evangelista and Linda’s then-boyfriend actor Kyle MacLachlan join the others. Actress Ione Skye (then married to Adam Horovitz) models, as does downtown “It” girl Chloë Sevigny. The director Mike Mills designed the X-Girl logo, and most of the clothes resemble thrifted sportswear pieces. There are carefully cut T-shirts that are inspired by deadstock football jerseys, tennis shirts, and ringer tees (a.k.a. the “uniform for indie rockers”). The two founding designers and Chloë Sevigny were the fit models, so the clothes run small, but the focus of the abbreviated clothes is not on being conventionally sexy. The A-line silhouette of the mini-skirts and thigh-skimming dresses was intended to be flattering, but Gordon and von Furth’s design philosophy eschewed lycra because it was too clingy. Built by Wendy's Wendy Mullin also worked on several of the first collections. She has a scrapbook on her site that recounts some of those early days, and she reminisces on how Kurt Cobain's death had happened so close to the show that it cast a pall over the excitement in the hours leading up to the event.

It’s interesting to note that a lot of the more mall-ready clothes of the era, from Judy’s to Contempo Casuals, featured a lot of slippery, tight near-100% lycra compositions for their baby dolls. X-Girl was more about architectural construction: The short-sleeved, crew-neck dresses were cut narrow but not tight, in order to graze the body without confining it. It was a nod to the crispness of mod, as was the choice for all the models to wear flats. Von Furth also makes sure to note that their trousers are low-slung and intended for the skater girl who does not have to relegate herself to wearing oversized boy’s pants that are not made for her physique. The stove-pipe leg is carried throughout, but with a low-slung, tighter fit around a waist with a flattering, thick band. Gordon is notably 7 months pregnant with a daughter she says she hopes is a riot grrl.

X-Girl was important because it was cool enough to be exclusive and fetch a hefty, limited-edition price tag, but none of the pieces ran north of $60 — a fact that was important to von Furth, who says that most of her peers buy their clothes at vintage stores. She is an obvious fashion and construction nerd, rattling off the exact years the clothes evoke; her deceptively simple design features contributed significantly to the line’s popularity.

X-Girl stores have closed since the production of this segment, though the label still exists in Japan. A collaboration with Nike Sportswear was only available in Japan; there have also been collaborations with various bag brands. Two years after this show, von Furth is quoted in Vice about her styling work on a recent story in Dirt: “There was this cute kid named Mark Ronson [ed note: !!!!!] and it was about the lost generation of 1978… Alligator shirts and puffy down jackets and Rod Lavers.” Kim Gordon continues to work in fashion as well, and collaborated with Surface to Air in 2012. But this segment in 1994 is a huge moment in terms of the way mainstream fashion is being upstaged by streetwear, and how the power dynamic has shifted from the runway to the cool kids downtown. At one point, Sofia points out, somewhat facetiously, “You too can have a fashion show.” The words are enormously prophetic.

+ WATCH X-GIRL FASHION SHOW

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 31

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cindy crawford tracey ullman

Cindy Crawford plays dress-up with comedian Tracey Ullman at The Plaza Hotel in New York City in 1990.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 32
Title: Fifth Anniversary Special
Original Airdate: 7/19/94
Includes segments from:

  • Cindy Crawford And Tracey Ullman Play Dress Up (Episode 5)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Cindy Crawford's Vogue Shoot With Helmut Newton In Monte Carlo (Episode 10)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Calvin Klein's Advertising Campaign (Episode 10)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Linda Evangelista Model Profile (Episode 12)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Todd Oldham Refurbishes On A Budget (Episode 16)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • How To Pluck Your Eyebrows (Episode 18)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Kate Moss Model Profile (Episode 19)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Eve Salvail Model Profile (Episode 22)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Carol Shaw's Makeup Tips (Episode 25)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Cindy Crawford's Italian Vogue Shoot With Max Vadukul (Episode 27)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Amber Valletta Model Profile (Episode 27)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

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cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford and classmate Mike Dulin head to their 10-year high school reunion in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 33
Title: Fall Edition
Original Airdate: 9/21/94
Appearances: Stephane Sednaoui, Shalom Harlow

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: CINDY'S HIGH SCHOOL REUNION

Cindy Crawford may have risen to supermodel status, but her origins lie smack dab in the middle of an Illinois cornfield. For her ten-year high school reunion, Cindy returns to her family home in Dekalb, where Cynthia was (unsurprisingly) a fantastic student. She was on the pep club, student council and the math team; her yearbook photos reveal that she looked exactly the same in her senior year as she does at the time this segment was filmed. Her childhood friend Mike Dulin accompanies her to the dinner and dance, and everyone she talks to acts like a deer caught in headlights when faced with a camera crew. While her classmates are wearing double-breasted suits and fusty floral dresses, Cindy is wearing a spaghetti strap, bias-cut, black evening dress, and stands a foot taller than those around her. To her credit, you can tell that she wore a deliberately flattering but inconspicuous dress. At one point, she does, however, torture a male neighbor by asking if he was aware that she sunbathed nude on her roof. He’s flustered. You can tell that Cindy is as ambitious and sweet now as she was in school, but there is definitely some formality and distance due to her status. Being the most famous person to graduate from your high school may be a vindicating experience if you were bullied or otherwise unpopular, but you can tell that Cindy’s always been effortlessly well-liked, so she makes a point of saying hello to as many people as possible. It reminds us that superstars sometimes come from inauspicious places, and it’s weird to see worlds and time periods colliding. (It also makes me wonder how many of the guys bought her issue of Playboy.)

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD'S HS REUNION

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: BEST AND WORST FASHION OF FALL 1994

marc jacobs

Model Niki Taylor on the Marc Jacobs runway in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Anna Sui, Marc Jacobs, and Isaac Mizrahi all show piece-dyed, hyper-colored fur coats, and accents in the form of giant fur hats, fur collars and cuffs, and earmuffs. The toasty pieces are juxtaposed with tiny slip dresses and mini-skirts, but Calvin Klein bucked the trend with hemlines skimming the knee in somber 1940s cuts. Vivienne Tam took the somewhat out-of-vogue crochet trend for a patterned “grandma’s potholder” look, and Byron Lars ended his show with models dressed in skeleton bodices with floor-length black shirts, lifted up for the dramatic surprise of grass skirts tied around their knees.

+ WATCH '94 FALL FASHION SHOWS

STREET STYLE: MIXING HIGH/LOW IN NEW YORK

dom casual

Fall fashion trends from Dom Casual in 1994.
Photo: MTV

This piece employs the New York streets as the runway, and while it includes stuff from Anna Sui and Jean Paul Gaultier, the other fashion credits are Liquid Sky, X-Girl, and magazine editor/photographer/stylist Walter Cessna’s short-lived line, Dom Casual. All three are indie labels with a renegade staff and youthful attitude. Dom Casual’s claim to fame was that the first fall collection featured clothing made from blankets allegedly stolen from American Airlines. Walter was slapped with a cease and desist, which led the company to pull its dresses from Pat Field and TG-170, a boutique on Ludlow Street. Walter had also been preparing a spring season featuring terry cloth skirts made from towels jacked from the Ritz-Carlton, which met a similar fate. The controversy hobbled the fashion company financially. Walter then pursued an illustrious career in media: He published a fashion magazine called The Key, which poked fun at New York’s Fashion Avenue. He also contributed as a writer/stylist/photographer to NY Talk, iD, Paper, The Village Voice, Interview and Elle.

The rest of the street style segment features a slew of textured accessories: corduroy house slippers, shearling shoes, and fuzzy, animal-print hats. There are cross-dressing gents in Jean Paul Gaultier, horned hats à la Jamoriquai, exaggerated collars, sweater vests, and A-line miniskirts. Fur and feather accents dominated outerwear, like marabou cuffs and jacket trims,and poufs on sweaters. Socks are pulled way up and shirts shrunken to bare the midriff. Rave culture had definitely infiltrated the downtown scene for a few years by this point, and clothing and record store Liquid Sky (where Chloë Sevigny famously worked) contributed logo tees and ripstop nylon rave pants.

+ WATCH '94 FALL FASHION TRENDS

MUSIC AND FASHION: BOSS HOG'S CRISTINA MARTINEZ AND HOLLIS QUEENS GET GIRLIE

boss hog

Hollis Queens and Cristina Martinez of Boss Hog show off sexy style in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Since this is the episode that Cindy Crawford visits her hometown, the segment starts off with her remembering how she used to sneak off to her church's cemetery to hook up with boys and ends with how she and her friends were so broke that the three of them would share fries and loiter for hours at the local McDonalds to pass time.

The middle portion of the segment shows members of the American punk blues band Boss Hog getting extra girlie in a massive hotel suite with slinky dresses, tiaras and a grip of makeup. Boss Hog was the collaborated effort of Jon Spencer (of Blues Explosion fame) and his wife Cristina Martinez (who sang vocals), Jens Jurgensen is on bass, Mark Boyce on keyboard and Hollis Queens played the drums. In this segment Cristina and Hollis have a slumber party—they have a cocktail, nosh on room service shave each other's legs, have an impromptu photo shoot and spend the night.

+ WATCH BOSS HOG MODELS PROM

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: PHOTOGRAPHER STEPHANE SEDNAOUI

stephane sednaoui

Photographer Stephane Sednaoui shoots model Shalom Harlow for French 'Glamour' in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Downtown “it” girl correspondent Zoe Cassavetes is back again, this time on location for a Stephane Sednaoui shoot in Chinatown with model Shalom Harlow. Stephane, despite never having gone to school for photography or directing, would go on to direct a ton of critically acclaimed, highly-stylized music videos for the Red Hot Chili Peppers (“Give It Away”), U2 (“Mysterious Ways”), Smashing Pumpkins ("Today”), Björk (“Big Time Sensuality,” “Possibly Maybe”), and Alanis Morissette (“Ironic”).

Stephane is obviously an eccentric and a bit of an exhibitionist. He feeds off the energy of the rubbernecking passersby while marching down Bowery in a sarong. Shalom looks similarly gonzo in this shoot for French Glamour, which is intended to look like a “Futuristic Japanese comic book.” She sports dramatic makeup, and the fashion is hyper-colored and fun.

+ WATCH STEPHANE SEDNAOUI ON SET WITH SHALOM HARLOW

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 33

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cindy crawford jon stewart

Cindy Crawford with MTV Correspondent Jon Stewart and Director of Elite Model Management Ann Veltri in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 34
Title: Best Of Edition
Original Airdate: 10/19/94
Includes segments from:

  • Cindy Crawford Hangs Out With MTV's New Guy Jon Stewart (Episode 29)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Sibyl Buck Model Profile (Episode 29)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Modeling In Japan (Episode 30)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Todd Oldham Teaches Ricki Lake How To Pack (Episode 30)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • X-Girl Streetwear Fashion Show (Episode 31)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

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sheryl crow cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford goes shoe shopping with singer Sheryl Crow in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 35
Title: Winter Edition
Original Airdate: 11/9/94
Appearances: Sheryl Crow, Nadja Auermann, Kevyn Aucoin

MUSIC AND FASHION: CINDY AND SHERYL CROW GO SHOE SHOPPING

Warning: This clip is filled with so much stellar mid-’90s John Fluevog shoe porn that it's nuts. It may or may nor compel you to fall into an eBay time-suck scouring for their throwbacks so be careful. Anyway, this segment is exactly what it sounds like: Cindy and Sheryl Crow hit up a bunch of New York shoe stores. What makes it interesting is that the two ladies are extra comfortable around each other, because they’ve entered into this tacit, mutual acknowledgement that they’re both a little square.

In the old Otto Tootsi Plohound shoe boutique, Sheryl longingly points at a pair of knee-high silver boots with shoelace eyelets that are modeled after ice-skate hooks, and remarks that someone like Kim Gordon would look great in them, but that she couldn’t pull them off. Cindy insists that Sheryl try them on, and even shares a boot-lacing shortcut. Sheryl mentions that she has corns on her toes because of years spent dancing backup for male headliners on tour. She pointedly notes that they insisted on tight clothes, which often meant uncomfortable heels as well. Cindy tries on a pair of lug-heeled sneakers.

Cindy calls John Fluevog the “funky shoe store,” and here they seem slightly intimidated by the 5” platform heels, thick straps and bright vinyl. I was hoping to see some sightings of the single buckled pilgrim strap “Munsters” that were huge in 1990 when Lady Miss Kier wore them on the Deee-Lite World Clique album cover, but was just as thrilled to see the sculpted heels on all the other classics at the flagship in 1995.

Then Sheryl and Cindy head to Steve Madden, where Sheryl falls in love with a pair of silver Mary Janes that she declares “Courtney Love.” Cindy even admits that she’s always wanted to try on some Puma Clydes. It may just be because Cindy’s feet were killing her and she needed something more comfortable, but it’s also sweet that she wanted to participate in a “cool” shoe movement of the day that was embodied by skate kids and the Beastie Boys. Sheryl comments on a pair that were so uncomfortable there’s no way any human could wear them, but Cindy’s quick to say that “those” club girls could and would. It’s almost as if Cindy is letting House of Style fans know that she’s aware of the trends, but that she'd never claim to be a part of any such subculture embodying them.

+ WATCH SHERYL CROW SHOE SHOPS

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: NADJA AUERMANN

nadja auermann

Model Nadja Auermann in 1994.
Photo: MTV

This segment introduces the notion that, in order to build a supermodel, there is an algorithm of important components that must lock into place. Of course, with Nadja Auermann and her alarmingly long legs, we can’t ignore unusually beautiful preternatural traits, but then, there are other things to consider—like the importance of a model’s hair color.

Nadja’s memorable because of her stark white hair and her milky white skin. She can look anywhere from angelic to extraterrestrial; from a milk maid to a Cylon from Battlestar Galactica. There’s something terrifyingly blank about Nadja’s expression and her chilly Teutonic disposition. Even in interviews, talking about something as pedestrian as knitting to kill time backstage, she seems like she’s got several other agendas churning simultaneously. It’s remarkable, therefore, how ordinary she looks with her former shoulder-length auburn hair. If not for a French Vogue shoot where they powdered a patch of hair white, she might never have discovered what made her look click. Even Nadja herself admits how uninspired her appearance had been before. It’s like every moment of truth in America’s Next Top Model: The girl who tries something drastic is often rewarded.

Nadja was memorable in the ’90s for her shoots with Helmut Newton and a particularly memorable one in American Vogue found her outfitted with metal scaffolding on her legs as if she’d had her bones pinned or was wearing a fashion brace. To my eyes, she’d never looked more like a Borg, but it was criticized for its insensitivity to those who were legitimately disabled.

Nadja, who grew up in West Berlin, is the first model interviewed for this series who talks about the effect of politics on her life. She believes education makes a good model, and you get the impression that, for some women, a career in modeling is a type of finishing school, where you develop poise, glamour and a self-possession that makes your beauty that much more scary.

+ WATCH NADJA AUERMANN

DEMYSTIFYING STYLE: TODD AND KEVYN ON 'THE ART OF MAKEUP'

kevyn aucoin

Designer Todd Oldham interviews makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin about his book, 'The Art of Makeup' in 1994.
Photo: MTV

On the release of Kevyn Aucoin’s new book, The Art of Makeup, Todd and Kevyn discuss the late makeup artist's origin story of growing up in Louisiana practicing makeup on his younger sister, and how he learned what worked best through simple trial and error. On beauty, Kevyn and Todd share a lot of the same philosophies, and even though Kevyn will cite curling eyelashes as his number 1 tip and mentions that shaping your brows (or “wrangling” as Todd calls it) is the most dramatic thing you can do short of cosmetic surgery to alter your face, his life philosophy is really all about confidence. Kevyn’s biggest fashion and beauty faux pas is being afraid of what other people will think of your look. It’s very much in keeping with what we know of Todd (whose hair is tousled beautifully this episode) and his message of self-love and overcoming fear and self-consciousness.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM MAKEUP TIPS WITH KEVYN AUCOIN

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 35

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mario testino

Photographer Mario Testino goes on a rainy day photo shoot in Milan in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 36
Title: Best Of Edition (Tribute To Fashion Photographers)
Original Airdate: 12/14/94
Includes segments from:

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cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford interviews photographer Gilles Bensimon at a photo shoot for 'Elle' magazine in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 37
Title: Romance Edition
Original Airdate: 2/14/95
Appearances: Gilles Bensimon, Bridget Hall, Morris Lapidus, Zoe Cassavetes, Adam Horovitz, Luscious Jackson, Toure

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: CINDY INTERVIEWS BRIDGET HALL, GILLES BENSIMON

By now, Cindy is a pro journo. While interviewing Bridget Hall, our host totally calls the young model out on being a hypocrite for telling girls to stay in school, since Bridget dropped out to make money. That's when things get real and they both bro down to talk about how grueling the job is.

With former Elle Magazine creative director and current America's Next Top Model photographer, Gilles Bensimon, Cindy is similarly about her business. She asks him how much control he exerts on set. He bristles at "control," explaining that his shoots are a collaborative experience and a group effort. Gilles maps out all of the looks beforehand, hiring a fit model to try on the outfits, which he then sketches to figure out if he likes the ensemble or not. This is an interesting contrast to the way Stephen Sprouse, Ellen Von Unwerth and Helmut Newton shoot.

Cindy has shot with Gilles for Elle covers before, and despite Gilles’s self-consciousness around our cameras, Cindy remarks that Gilles genuinely loves women. He looks slightly offended, as if she’s just called him pervy, but he's quickly disarmed. It’s nice to see Cindy so relaxed. Her hair is soft, she’s wearing a pastel cashmere tee with jeans, and she seems comfortable in her role as reporter. Gilles was formerly married to Elle MacPherson, but reality TV viewers may recognize him as the ex-husband to Kelly Killoren of The Real Housewives of New York City.

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD INTERVIEWS GILLES BENSIMON


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: TODD TIME WITH MORRIS LAPIDUS

todd oldham morris lapidus

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham interviews architect Morris Lapidus in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Todd continues to interview people who inspire him creatively. For this segment, he speaks to architect Morris Lapidus about his contributions to the South Beach skyline of Miami Beach. Morris, who studied architecture at Columbia, designed the Le Fountainbleu and the Eden Roc. His aesthetic has been called modern and post-modern, but for our purposes, that means swooping, curved lines, whimsical details and an exacting sense of humor. With Fountainbleu, he went “hog wild,” creating a giant curve to eschew the notion that buildings had to be rectangular.

Morris and Todd walk around Morris’s properties to pluck out details — like the bowtie pattern on floor tiles (a hat tip to Morris’s sartorial particularities), and how he hates certain patches of wallpaper for covering what was previously a beautiful mural. We already know how interior design influences Todd’s fashion designs, so it makes sense that Todd would want to talk to creators from this disciplines. Morris, who passed away in 2001, was a riot. He says he got rid of his generation's critics by outliving them, and cuts his own interview by telling us to stop rolling.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM TALKS ARCHITECTURE


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: ZOE CASSAVETES AND ADAM HOROVITZ GO VALENTINE'S DAY SHOPPING FOR IONE SKYE

adam horovitz

Adam Horovitz of the Beastie Boys goes Valentine's Day shopping for his wife Ione Skye in 1995.
Photo: MTV

As a kid, I thought it was awesome that Adam Horovitz was married to actress Ione Skye. Not only was it an example of two cultural worlds colliding (music and acting), it was awesome that two cool people in large cities felt compelled to marry so young. I thought it was SO romantic (less so now, ahem...). Ione, who you’ll also recognize as a model in the X-Girl show, seems chill, and the fact that Adam is unworried about what to get her for Valentine’s Day in this clip with Zoe Cassavetes is sort of fantastic. Everyone is being normal and relatable.

Zoe, at this point of the series, is our “youth culture correspondent,” and her IRL friendship with Adam makes a trip to Frederick’s of Hollywood for lingerie infinitely less awkward or annoyingly sexxxy. A sheer white marabou-feather-trimmed bed jacket and a black, vinyl trench coat (that you can totally tell Zoe's going to go back for) are considered too racy, so they swan off to a candy store.

There will be no heart-shaped Russell Stover box for Ione. Instead, they go to a bulk candy joint and go nuts with scoopfuls of jelly beans, chocolates, a Ring pop and an Astro pop. Then there’s a quick stop into a photo printing store, where Adam gets an I Dream Of Jeannie-themed picture of himself on a mirror, and his shopping is complete. The experience is low-fi and there's nothing that Adam bought that any college or high school kid couldn’t afford. It's too bad Ione bought him a diamond-encrusted Ducati Desmosedici RR superbike! JK. She didn't do that. Especially since he sold his gold helmet to buy her the mirror.

+ WATCH V-DAY SHOPPING WITH ADAM HOROVITZ


MUSIC AND FASHION: LUSCIOUS JACKSON GOES SHOPPING

luscious jackson

Luscious Jackson and Theo Kogan of the Lunachicks at Perfidia's Hair World in New York City in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Luscious Jackson was an all-female group signed to the Beasties’ label Grand Royal. You may remember “Naked Eye,” the first single from their second album, Fever In Fever Out. Or “Here,” on the Clueless soundtrack. They disbanded only to reunite in 2011. This segment was filmed a full two years before they would hit it big in the Billboard charts in 1997, and it’s cool to see the ladies in their hometown of New York, and finding out what stores they frequent.

It’s awesome to get to see the original Perfidia’s Hair World in Patricia Field’s former location on 8th Street. The musicians are outfitted with enormous, stylized pieces: a look for a retro stewardess, rainbow layers, Wynonna Judd hair. You may recognize the aplomb and potential for humor when you realize that Perfidia of Perfidia’s Hair World was also responsible for Jerri Blank’s hair on the Amy Sedaris TV show Strangers With Candy. So classic.

We then run into the incomparable Theo Kogan of Lunachicks (and now Theo and The Skyscrapers), who looks sensational in massive strappy platform heels and socks, a tiny black and white dress, enormous red hair, and a head band that features wire bunny ears that predates Marc Jacobs’s bunny ears for Louis Vuitton, which Madonna famously wore at the 2009 Met Gala.

The group then goes thrift shopping at Housing Works, a charity shop that benefits homeless people in New York living with HIV and AIDS. The girls buy cardigans and puffy ski jackets that express their love of orange and beige. Then it’s a surprising trip to Brooks Brothers, where they pick up mixed-pattern shirts and clashing, hyper-preppy argyle sweaters, because menswear lasts longer and is often cheaper than comparable ladies’ clothes. It’s a lesson in perspective; counter-culture clothing can sometimes just be mainstream stuff flipped on its head.

+ WATCH LUSCIOUS JACKSON GOES SHOPPING


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: AROMATHERAPY IS EN VOGUE

toure

Massage and aromatherapy with TV personality and novelist Touré in 1995.
Photo: MTV

This is a Valentine’s Day themed package on essential oils, but it’s also a reminder of how aromatherapy dominated the marketplace in the mid-‘90s. There wasn’t a gift shop in the world that didn’t sell a diffuser, and we all suddenly knew about the effects of sandalwood and what ylang ylang was. Admittedly, part of the reason why I wanted to share this footage is that it includes a very young Touré.

The Rolling Stone contributor, novelist and TV pop culture pundit learns about acupressure and reflexology from the comfort of a bathrobe and speaks in soothing tones as he is massaged in the cover of candlelight. It’s all very ’90s, back when we thought alternative therapies and not standing desks would SAVE OUR LIVES.

+ WATCH AROMATHERAPY


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: SOFIA COPPOLA LAUNCHES MILKFED

sofia coppola

Sofia Coppola at the fashion show for her clothing line Milkfed in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Did you know that Milkfed was still being sold in Japan? No idea what the hell a Milkfed even is? Back in 1994, before she was an Oscar-winning director, Sofia launched a clothing brand. She started out with logo and graphic tees (you'll see a SUPER early version of the Che Geuvara joint in our footage) and I recall being especially fond of their tanks because there were super flattering at the arm and didn't give you armpit fat even if you were wearing the wrong bra.

Milkfed also made cut-and-sew items like A-line minis and simple pinafores and even if Sofia talks about her designing shortcomings (she does NOT consider herself a designer), this ex-Chanel intern definitely knows her audience. All of her clothes were affordable without being mainstream, like, the GAP and she simply made clothes that she and her friends liked that couldn't be found in stores. Boom.

+ WATCH SOFIA COPPOLA


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 37

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linda evangelista

Model Linda Evangelista in Chanel at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 38
Title: Best Of Edition (March Model Madness)
Original Airdate: 3/14/95
Includes segments from:

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kate moss jon stewart linda evangelista

MTV correspondent Jon Stewart backstage with models Kate Moss and Linda Evangelista at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 39
Title: New York Fashion Week
Original Airdate: 4/11/95
Appearances: Jon Stewart, Kate Moss, Linda Evangelista, Calvin Klein, Tatjana Patitz, Simon LeBon, Todd Oldham, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Elle MacPherson

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: JON STEWART GOES BACKSTAGE AT CALVIN KLEIN

Jon Stewart is his delightful, funny self at New York Fashion Week as he goes backstage at Calvin Klein and attends rehearsal. We’ve accompanied House of Style to several Fashion Weeks in New York by now, so we have a frame of reference for how our new host is being treated. Jon is regarded with suspicion, and we seem to be getting less access than when we’re with Cindy since she often walks in the shows she covers. He interviews Calvin Klein and the designer treats the comedian like an interloper. It's not total side eye with daggers but it's definitely screw-mouth emoji.

Jon, to his credit, stays cracking the jokes, pointing out the loose butane canister among the makeup and commenting on sleeping models backstage. It’s observational humor run amok, and we don’t learn anything new or servicey but it's hilarious. Jon is bowled over, understandably, by Kate Moss, and slinks over to her and Linda Evangelista, who have cracked open a bottle of champagne to toast the end of the week. You can’t help wondering if Cindy called ahead to ask them to be nice to the new guy.

+ WATCH JON STEWART BACKSTAGE AT CALVIN KLEIN


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: TATJANA PATITZ

tatjana patitz

Model Tatjana Patitz at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Tatjana Patitz talks about how she only uses nondescript duffel bags to cart her Fashion Week stuff because the fancy luggage tends to get stolen. Good tip if you had any designs on becoming a world-traveling supermodel. It’s interesting to see what a model packs since she’ll be wearing other people’s clothes for such a large part of the week, so this is a peek into what Tatjana will be wearing to dinner and parties. There are a number of pretty Tocca dresses, bright bras and Manolo heels.

So far, this episode has given us a renewed sense of how much models loathe working Fashion Week. We’ve heard countless stories about how they'd rather do editorial, how exhausted they are during show weeks and Tatjana even admits that every time she tells herself, "Never again." We shadow Tatjana at Betsey Johnson and Todd Oldham, and then follow her to events with the likes of Molly Ringwald, RuPaul and the ever-present patron saint of the rockstar supermodelizer, Simon LeBon.

+ WATCH TATJANA PATITZ


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: HOW TO BUILD A TODD OLDHAM FASHION SHOW

todd oldham

Finale of the Todd Oldham runway show at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Todd, ever the gracious host, opens his Fashion Week show to us with unparalleled access and hospitality. A mere 3 hours before his show, he is energized and not at all pitching a fit or freaking people around him with stressball energies the way some other designers would be. He wears a shrunken polo shirt with a long-sleeved tee underneath it and takes time out to talk to us about the months leading up to this moment. First he created the custom prints and embroideries, then he determined silhouettes, and finally he moved on to fine-tuning. There are typically 3-5 outfits per girl with a fitting for each. He shouts out his show producer Kevin Cryer, and we see the seating chart and have a new appreciation for the logistical nightmare that is a fashion show.

Twenty minutes before the show starts, Todd and Kevin go through the timing of the lights, the music and the order the girls will walk in. A quick visit to makeup with wizard Kevyn Aucoin shows us that the artist is taking brows to the next level by affixing a pair of slick, black vinyl ones on a stunningly young Tyra Banks. During Todd’s commentary about the various things that need to get accomplished, he mentions interviews that are required of him backstage, does one, and then returns to us moments before the first walk.

There’s clapping and last-minute details. Even during the walk, Todd allows our cameras to stay with him. He points out with interesting details and even has a model remove her lumpy undergarments, which he sticks into his back pocket. We’ve talked to Cindy during shows, but a designer’s stakes are different and this is the closest we’ve been to the enormous pressure.

Just minutes later it’s over. The leathers, stripes, metallic brocades, sequins and quilted satins are well-received by no less than Ivana Trump and Susan Sarandon. A broken heel sends Todd into peals of laughter. We watch models as they ask to borrow clothes for various parties, and we have a new appreciation of Todd for his kindness and cool demeanor.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM PUTS ON A FASHION SHOW


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: WHAT IT'S LIKE FOR A BUYER

seventeen magazine

'Seventeen' magazine Fashion Editor Marie Moss at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

With Cindy, we’ve sat front row and learned what it’s like to wear the hat of a fashion editor, but the other person who is politically entitled to prominent placement in the seating arrangement is the buyer. Here we talk to Kim Koshiol, buyer at Bloomingdales, and compare her experiences with those of Marie Moss, the senior fashion editor at Seventeen. This is a new target age group for us, and an important one since we're MTV so it’s interesting to note how high-fashion trends are adaptable for the teen fashion world.

When shopping for a department store, the entire collection must be considered for its overall appeal, price and quality. Instead of matching themes for an editorial shoot, the line has to be featured together on the sales floor, so cohesiveness must be considered.

For the fashion editor, trends across several different designers have to gel so that story ideas can be developed throughout the season and honed through additional showroom visits. What the 16 and 17-year-old girl will take away from the runway differs from the response of an older more affluent customer and styles need to assessed based on what will trickle down.

We interview designer Yeohlee Teng, who mentions that the fashion editor and buyer work in tandem. You need the editors in order to get your message out, and you need the buyers to get the clothes out. Longevity has to be considered. Betsey Johnson has good relationships with her buyers, and though her eponymous line recently filed for bankruptcy (much to our dismay) her runway trends have always resonated with The Youngs.

Most of the trends are texturally — or color-driven — basically, nothing that can't be mimicked across price points. For fall, it’s mixed textures, matching matte with shine, leather with suede, and the color brown. Betsey, of course, bucks trends, and makes a major play for hyper-color cowgirl.

+ WATCH FASHION WEEK FOR BUYERS


RISE OF THE SUPERMODELS: FASHION CAFÉ

fashion cafe

Models Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell and Elle MacPherson at the opening of The Fashion Café in 1995.
Photo: MTV

In 1995, Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schiffer, Christy Turlington and Elle MacPherson opened a restaurant devoted to fashion in Rockefeller Center. It was during the heyday of Hard Rock, and models were still fetching multimillion-dollar deals, so it’s understandable that naming plates of shrimp after beautiful women and showing runway footage while peddling buffalo wings wasn’t immediately noticed as being a total fiasco.

We know now that the investors were shady, and a couple of years later would be indicted as money launderers, but even in food critic Ruth Reichl’s write up for the New York Times, she nails the major problem with the business model: Fashion imagery makes you feel conflicted about eating middle-of-the-road bar food and Oreo-branded cheesecake. During the launch party, we admire displays of jewelry, iconic dresses and David Copperfield’s hair while he talks about how stoked he is (UM, remember when he and Claudia were engaged for a zillion years?). Something about the intersection of these factors and a ominous quote from music and fashion legend Malcolm McLaren (i.e. “[this is] probably the end of fashion as we know it”) makes for a vivid jumping-the-shark moment for the ’90s Supermodel. The Fashion Café would close three years later, but not before Naomi renounced her involvement by refusing to appear at events or be caught dead in the midtown restaurant. A promotional leather jacket from Fashion Café cost $1,500, whereas the most expensive item on the menu would set you back $18.95.

+ WATCH FASHION CAFÉ


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: BAD ETIQUETTE AT SHOWS

sibyl buck

Model Sibyl Buck gives her opinion on bad fashion show etiquette at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

This is the turning point in our Fashion Week coverage, as House of Style keeps it all too real regarding the drawbacks of the event. There are definitely some ugly moments in championing beautiful design, and we actually get to hear how loud it is in the press risers and backstage at the show. Wavy-haired, power-drunk producers and security people are rude and flagrantly abusive. People get trampled as spectators exit and enter the spaces. We even hear from Sibyl Buck that she and other models suspect designers of recycling used G-strings, and there’s a moment of Sandra Bernhard losing her mind at Michael Musto on the topic of sexuality. After the mayhem, however, everyone comments on how low-key this season has been compared to others. We get the impression that Fashion Week is like childbirth. Everyone forgets how excruciating it all is the moment it’s over.

+ WATCH FASHION WEEK ETIQUETTE


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: TRENDS OF FALL 1995

marc jacobs

Marc Jacobs had the best suits of the Fall 1995 collections.
Photo: MTV

It’s all about the headkerchief in every fabric from cotton to leather. The models at Miu Miu are morose. Marc Jacobs and other designers celebrate the lady and show a great deal of shrewdly cut suits without any of the vestigial influence of the ’80s power suit. There is, of course, the deeply upsetting ubiquity of the most fuggo shoe silhouette from the mid-’90s: the calf-length boot with a kitten heel. Barf. Also, CANKLES.

+ WATCH '95 FALL FASHION SHOWS


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 39

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helmut newton

Photographer Helmut Newton and 'Vogue' magazine Creative Director Grace Coddington in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 40
Title: Swimsuit Edition
Original Airdate: 5/23/95
Appearances: Helmut Newton, Grace Coddington, Eva Herzigova

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: HELMUT NEWTON'S EVA HERZIGOVA 'VOGUE' SHOOT

Helmut Newton is as much a household name as his models, and here we find him shooting again for American Vogue with legendary creative director Grace Coddington. In every way, this is a study in contrasts, and with Helmut, an entire shoot can hinge on him riffing on an image. For his notes on this shoot with Eva Herzigova (notably and unsurprisingly another Aryan-looking ice queen of a subject), he simply had the notion that he would oil her up and she would look like a young Greek goddess. He admits that he’s strayed from his original idea as the shoot progressed, and though you can see hints at Grecian cues in her blonde hair, curled and pinned at the base of her neck, that’s where all intentions fly out the door. It’s fascinating to see Helmut’s brain work, and he explains that inspiration for him is all about a “point of departure.” Were he to wait for the “divine spark to move Helmut,” he says, “we would have to wait and that other positions presented themselves.”

It’s amazing to watch how Helmut works, especially since he’s so articulate and aware of his process. Ellen von Unwerth, for instance, comes from a place of having modeled, and can evoke certain candid, sexy moods by remaining unobtrusive while encouraging girls to play as naturally as possible. With Gilles Bensimon, it’s an exercise in planning, deliberation and showcasing his admiration for women, and while Helmut clearly loves women too, his methods are about projecting fantasies from his own psyche. His point of view and perversions are very much his, and the process is far less collaborative; he talks about how mechanical and precise the resulting photos are. He asks Eva several times to move her fingers slightly or change the placement of a hand. It’s not a flurry of shots as much as it is changing details until he has exactly what he wants.

Helmut says that no aspect of his shoot is about intellectual instruction, but he is shrewd about the fashion photography climate. He abstains from red lipstick because it’s boring; he says he’s easily bored because he’s superficial and has no attention span. He rails against his critics because he thinks that political and social analyses of his photographs miss the point, yet he obviously knows exactly what feelings he’ll evoke, since he’s careful in sullying Eva’s otherwise pristine image by keeping the soles of her feet filthy, and by calling himself politically incorrect.

Helmut Newton is a boon to fashion photography, and even though there are plenty of talented photographers who are still around, there’s something about his very specific voice that I miss. While it’s awesome that technology has democratized fashion photography in terms of barrier to entry with easy-to-use DSLRs and the proliferation of fashion blogs, it’s heartbreaking that there are so few forums for truly romanticized fashion editorials that show off strong voices. The drama has suffered somewhat in favor of technical or journalistic photographs that show how Italian men layer or tie their scarfs or how kids on the street dress, and while candid shots have their merit, I can’t help thinking we have a long way to go before budgets like these will be supported for online-exclusive content without it being an ad campaign, or designed by an agency to look like an editorial. A lot of U.S. fashion editorials these days exist to illustrate a service or glamorize what’s essentially a clothing catalog, and it straight bums me out.

+ WATCH HELMUT NEWTON SHOOTS EVA HERZIGOVA


POP CULTURE AND FASHION: DAISY FUENTES'S SWIMSUIT SHOOT

This is sorta like the Cindy shoot in Mexico and predates MTV regular Daisy Fuentes becoming our host by two years, but it's interesting to compare the two calendars. Both of them were concerned about what this means for their image but recognize how important it is for their careers to acknowledge the dude-fans. Daisy opts for a female photographer which alters the dynamic somewhat.

+ WATCH DAISY FUENTES' SWIMSUIT SHOOT


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: SWIMSUITS IN NYC

This season’s swimsuit trends range from metallic, detachable marabou feather trim, vintage cuts that resemble bras and girdles, and this newfangled stuff like looks like patent leather but is actually breathable and waterproof. To illustrate this, we’ve got a pair of models posing on fire escapes, using payphones, standing in front of fire hydrant spray and fixing motorcycles. It’s all a bit confusing and very much reminds me of hilarious stock footage on Getty. It’s basically women laughing alone with salad.

+ WATCH SEXY SWIMSUITS


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 40

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MTV Style follows how people express themselves through fashion and beauty, from our favorite pop culture icons to you, the reader. We cover the fun, loud side of the industry with news, trends, interviews, videos, and more — MTV Style is fashion at full volume.

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I love these two as a couple. What a festive way to celebrate two important events in their life. Mariah looks like a dream.

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