House Of Style

Browse By

House Of Style

Follow Us

  1. Get the latest updates in your favorite RSS feed reader.

cindy crawford richard gere

Cindy Crawford interviews actor and boyfriend Richard Gere at the Gianni Versace AIDS Benefit in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 7
Title: Spring Edition
Original Airdate: 3/6/91
Appearances: Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schiffer, Christy Turlington, Richard Gere, Gianni Versace, Sylvester Stallone, Betsey Johnson, Andre Leon Talley

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: CINDY CRAWFORD AT THE GIANNI VERSACE AIDS FUNDRAISER

This clip is a jewel, not only for its peek into the Versace archive at a time when the clothes were at the apex of mixed-print, bold-hued richesse, but because you get to hear Gianni talk (albeit briefly) about a cause that was important to him. For the Friends of AIDS benefit, Cindy and the supermodels descend upon Chateau Marmont for a Versace fashion show attended by the most A-list Hollywood types. Cindy does double-duty for the evening, shooting a segment (with a “Cindy Cam” while she’s backstage) for House of Style, and walking in the show. Maybe it’s because Gianni Versace was a personal favorite of mine, or perhaps because he died so tragically, but the footage is notably bittersweet. Seeing how much the supermodels loved him and witnessing again how active he was, at the peak of his career, in the fight against AIDS is poignant — especially since this was at a time when the disease was swiftly destroying whole communities, and those who were HIV-positive were stigmatized by ignorance and hysteria. “For the problem of AIDS,” says Versace, “for the problem that touches many friends. I did this with the heart.”

Naomi serves formidable hair flip as she bounds down the runway. Claudia says she always feels pretty in Versace’s clothes. And in an odd transformative note, ever notice how Gianni Versace's Italian-ness rubs off on Christy Turlington? Her Versace billboards in the opening shot are a vision of sun-kissed, smoky-eyed, Sophia Loren-esque goodness.

Everyone backstage is calm, and the show runs smoothly. We’ve been seeing a lot of early ’90s Versace lately: Lady Gaga had a field day with the archive for a media blitz earlier this year, there isn’t a tony vintage store worth its salt that doesn’t carry a couple of pieces, Drake wore a printed Versace button-up to his birthday, and the ornate-bordered shirt has been knocked off countless times, but the differences are palpable when you’re seeing the clothes in this context—on the backs of these models—when Gianni Versace was alive.

The magic lies in the movement. Versace mixed polka dots and houndstooth, filigree and floral, with everything in electric, hyper-saturated tones, all on the finest fabrics. Watching the silk suits glide down the runway is unreal because the prints undulate and billow. Gianni Versace knew how to cut: The precision and structural integrity of what would otherwise be too-whimsical in its cavalier opulence make his clothes compulsively wearable. I never thought I’d type these words, but Sylvester Stallone says it best: “Versace has his feet firmly planted in traditionalism. But every now and then, he brings about an air of theatricality. So if you feel like being a bit bold, his clothes kinda bridge that gap.” The fact that Stallone is wearing a silk lapel, wing-collar shirt and has his nails buffed to a high sheen makes this pop culture nugget that much more satisfying. Another quotable tidbit comes from Sandra Bernhard: “I think the war has gotten Bush off the hook for a while, but AIDS is an ongoing war and battle that really hasn’t been properly fought.” And, of course, there’s Naomi Campbell, who displays startling honesty about the “most embarrassing thing in [her] closet." Let's just say, she talks about something of a deeply... um... penetratively... personal nature.

We also see Andre Leon Talley snap photos of our host, and for Cindy superfans, this is the first moment where Richard Gere (Cindy's first husband) has ever seen her in this role. He’s gobsmacked. You can tell he thinks himself the luckiest bastard in the world for having landed this woman (in super-sexy, head-to-toe Versace, having just MODELED it) holding an MTV mic cube and interviewing him like a real-life journalist.

“This is amazing because we’ve known each other for two and a half years and I’ve never seen you do this before,” Gere stammers. “This is incredible. I’m just kind of floored.” From Steven Seagal in a band collar with Kelly LeBrock (dressed like a sad clown) in tow, to a photo of Michael Landon and Rod Stewart and Rachel Hunter in matching teased coifs, this was a wonderful collision of worlds, and we’re lucky that MTV was there to capture it.

+ WATCH THE VERSACE AIDS BENEFIT


DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: WHERE DO BABYDOLL DRESSES COME FROM?

betsey johnson

Designer Betsey Johnson in 1991.
Photo: MTV

The term “babydoll dress” may have not been coined by Betsey Johnson, but she can certainly lay claim to popularizing the '60s silhouette in the '90s. (The thing I love most about her floral versions is that they had pockets!) “This shape… à la maternity/pregnancy, I’ve been calling the babydoll,” she says. “It’s very naive, very sweet, very young, very innocent look. It’s a mystery after the bust. And that’s what’s interesting, because it’s got a very sexy little top part, and then after that it’s like, who knows? Is she hippy? Is she skinny? What is she under there?”

In this segment, we explore “warm weather dresses” and it’s a romp through Central Park with models in different versions of the summer staple, intercut with designers in their work rooms. There is a beautiful version by New York designer Carmelo Pomodoro, whose promising career would be cut short the following year when he died of AIDS-related pneumonia at just 37 years old. He calls this his “princess dress”: it features a demure, boxy, clavicle-skimming neckline (“I have a personal relationship with the clavicle. I think it’s the sexiest part of the body”) and a plunging back.

There is also a flowy, versatile, tank, A-line dress from Stacey Pecor at Hendris. The designer would go on to become a retail success story, founding the popular New York chain Olive and Bette's.

The final “picnic in the park” scene, with daisies and a somewhat slapdash “peace” flag, calls to mind an article entitled “Fashion: Baby Dolls, Naughty and Nice” by Anne-Marie Schiro, in an October 1990 issue of the New York Times. Schiro interviewed Kalman Ruttenstein, a senior VP for fashion direction at Bloomingdale’s, and Terry Melville, a VP and Fashion Director of the Junior/Contemporary category at Macy’s. The executives parsed the general silhouette of a baby doll (“high waist, high yoke, more fabric”; the textiles used: “chiffon, challis, stretch velvet and stretch lace”; and the predominant print: “florals… next in importance are dots, then geometrics and solid-color lace’). Melville and Ruttenstein also situated the dress as a revival of the “symbol of the 1960s youthquake.” I remember these dresses. We would wear them over tights with combat boots and a choker and your hair up in a French twist, or we’d wear them over a long-sleeved bodysuit; but I did not then or now consider them to be anything but very ’90s.

Even in 2012 with the high-waisted, floral print/lace ’90s dress enjoying a resurgence and the rising popularity of the choker on people born too recently to remember the decade—like Chloe Moretz and Sky Ferreira—I can’t help but wonder whether they know that the ’90s dresses are an homage to an earlier era. I certainly didn’t. If you show me a pair of silver clogs, I won’t think '1960s' I’ll always think '1991' because of the color and the execution. It’s the fingerprint that a decade leaves on a borrowed trend as it’s repeatedly revived in the future and I wonder what the effects will be as we look back on '80s trends from 2012 in 2032. Especially since these cycles shrink as technological innovations get faster and we become more peripatetic in pulling temporal inspiration. Colors change, mills introduce things like stretch lace, 3D printing becomes a reality and the price points for trends dip and democratize. Fashion is getting crazy accessible and it's fascinating. It's also interesting to see what’s picked up again with fondness and what’s left alone on each go 'round. We haven't yet seen the sleeveless white turtleneck bodysuit and the macramé flared-sleeve, calf-length duster but I’d bet money that they'll return. And I can't wait to see how they've changed.

+ WATCH WARM WEATHER DRESSES


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 7

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , , , , ,

cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford's swimsuit calendar shoot in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 8
Title: Swimsuit Edition
Original Airdate: 5/15/91
Appearances: Helena Christensen

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: CINDY CRAWFORD'S 1991 CALENDAR SHOOT

There are a handful of key branding milestones in Cindy’s career as a supermodel: the Pepsi ads, the workout tape and the swimsuit calendar. In this clip, we go on location for her calendar shoot in Cabo San Lucas with Marco Glaviano (photographer), Ronnie Stam (hair), and Carol Shaw (makeup), and get a peek behind the scenes. Cindy is as unaffected as ever. She recounts the dietary restrictions of prepping for a swimsuit shoot and complains good naturedly about the heat. She quips that one of the bottoms is way too tiny and pointedly remarks that a swimsuit that looks cheap in real life can photograph beautifully. Cindy also takes a moment to distinguish the different responsibilities of a shoot that she herself commissions versus a regular paid gig. Half of the calendar's proceeds went to fund leukemia research; today, copies can fetch anywhere from $50-$100 on eBay.

The photographs are pretty T&A-heavy. There are a lot of suggestive poses—“backshots” with thongs that generously feature Cindy’s posterior; seriously small bikinis; a topless denim look; and some see-through mesh one-pieces. Cindy’s hair is flipped in a deep side part and tousled with a little saltwater crunch. It’s funny because by this point in the show you know Cindy’s face well enough that you can watch it transform from her regular, talking, House of Style face to her "model" face.

This is also one of the moments where you recall how major Cindy was. Girl is insanely hardbody. Sure, she's thin but it's her muscle tone in those hiiiiiiiiigh-cut late-’80s-early-’90s bathing suit bottoms that's mind-blowing. You can’t really compare it to the musculature of any working model today. It's Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue-esque but even more... honed.

The reason why this shoot is a big deal is because the calendar is such a savvy business move. It recognizes how fickle the high-fashion industry is by broadening her appeal exponentially. Even amongst supermodels, this is what makes Cindy exceptional: She knows that hanging in the back office of a garage or the wall of a college kid's dorm does not preclude selling the romance of a $30,000 evening gown. It’s not about getting bullied by an d-bag photographer and pushy stylist on the set of a men’s magazine shoot. This is a multiple-page advertisement for Cindy by Cindy. “For this kind of thing, because it’s my project, it’s my calendar… I want to see the Polaroids,” she says. “We don’t shoot until Marco and I have agreed that we both think it looks good.” The images are timeless. Marco explains, “I believe that this type of photography, even though they may seem simple now and pin-up-y or whatever, years from now they’re going to weather and age better than the other pictures we do, which are maybe more artistic.”

+ WATCH CINDY'S CABO CALENDAR SHOOT


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: HELENA CHRISTENSEN

helena christiansen

Model Helena Christensen in Paris in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Helena is sort of like Claudia Schiffer, in that it feels weird to have ever had to introduce the Danish supermodel to fashion fans. For a lot of us, she rolled into our lives in the black-and-white Herb Ritts music video for Chris Isaak’s multiplatinum “Wicked Game.” In it Helena appears near-naked and writhes around in the sand with a super sprung Isaak. The imagery is bewitching and the chemistry bonkers. “She walked up on the set and our eyes made contact,” remembers Isaak. “It was like there was an open book: Everybody read it and said, 'There is a magnetism between these people.'" The three-day shoot in Hawaii came after Helena modeled in Paris for two years, but before that, the 5’ 10” beauty was huge on the pageant circuit. Helena Christensen was crowned Miss Denmark and went on to represent her country at the 1986 Miss Universe pageant.

In fact, if you break down all the supermodels’ CVs and pedigrees, it’s like they’ve been engineered by a secret society of master eugenicists. Being the hot girl in a major video and being a beauty queen is cool but she's also a master linguist. “A model from South America taught me Spanish,” she says. “When you’re from Denmark, you learn a lot of languages because no one speaks Danish. You learn English, German, French. And then I speak Swedish because I’ve got lots of Swedish friends and it’s quite similar. It’s great to be able to speak languages in this business.” She'd also go on to become a respected photographer, open a store in the West Village (Butik), and be appointed creative director of Nylon magazine. No. Big. Deal.

Helena seems appealing and approachable here. She talks about her love of vintage clothing (her mother owned a vintage clothing store in Denmark) and looks unpolished. Whether it’s a post-beauty queen grunge period or her youth, Helena wears simple clothes, looks a wee bit wan and has mussed hair. She looks unkempt and totally badass.

+ WATCH THE HELENA CHRISTENSEN PROFILE


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 8

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , ,

amsterdam international fashion show

The Smirnoff International Fashion Show Awards in Amsterdam in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 9
Title: Summer '91
Original Airdate: 7/10/91
Appearances: Frans Ankoné, Joe Casely Hayford, Francesc Grau Tomás

DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: THE SMIRNOFF INTERNATIONAL FASHION AWARDS

There's so much going on in this clip and for reasons of weirdness, it's actually one of my favorites. I have one trillion individual beefs with the fashion industry but some of the pointier bits have to do with how designers' ideas are put under so much pressure to be commercially viable or be 1,000% red carpet fame-balls that so many silhouettes are compromised, boring and unimportant.

So when you remove any chance of mass production but provide a cash prize to dazzle some judges, the designing gets SUPER nuts. The Smirnoff Fashion Awards was a showcase that began in 1985 in the United Kingdom as a sponsored show in which student designers competed to win loot to either fund further schooling or provide seed money for a line. In 1991, the show went international with an event in Amsterdam that rounded up student designers from 25 different countries. I wish each of them had a blog because I would've read all about it.

It's actually frustrating how little information there is about the shows. If you look up the Smirnoff International Fashion Awards, you’ll learn that they were held anywhere from Cape Town to Toronto to New York City...until about 2003. The designs are zany and show-offy which is what you'd expect from kids with huge ideas and varying degrees of success at pulling them off. The shows look homespun and retain a “ball” feel because they were often held in nightclubs. Despite the dearth of information, we did discover that several of the designers and judges went on to fashion greatness. Alexander McQueen judged in 1995 and there's no way he would've granted points for anything less than extraordinary.

The designs in the 1991 show are scrappy and DIY-fancy. There is a disproportionate number of hoop skirts; see-through plastic things; dresses that jut out and are strung with so many dangling gewgaws that it makes the clothes look like mobiles or wind chimes. There are black-and-white jester outfits that feature dice as hats, and a series of models who walk out shrouded in giant, lumpy, elastic-gathered, bouffant surgical caps that are then removed to reveal the clothes underneath. I can't figure out a more elegant way to put it but basically it's like the body condom scene in Naked Gun. “The inspiration of the collection was artist Christo, the artist who wraps everything up,” says Vera Vandenbosch of Belgium. “I decided to wrap up the models.” OK, we're going deep in the nerd rabbit hole but Vera is a contender because she went to the Royal Academy in Antwerp, which is the same school attended by the “Antwerp six” (Ann Demeulemeester, Dries van Noten, Dirk Van Saene, Dirk Bikkenbergs, Walter Van Beirendonck and Marina Yee). Kris Van Assche (Dior Homme) also went there. So did Vincent Van Gogh. Vera did not win in 1991, but went on to become the director of e-commerce and design project management at the upscale furniture wonderland ABC Carpet & Home. She now lives in Brooklyn.

One of the judges that year was a lovely man by the name of Frans Ankoné. His résumé includes stints as the director of fashion and style at the New York Times magazine; a tenure as the Fashion Editor of German Vogue; and an appointment to the Fashion Director position at Detour magazine. Another judge, designer Joe Casely Hayford, went on to great acclaim. His impressive career ranges from dressing U2, the Clash, Seal and Duran Duran to making safari clothes from surplus tents in the early ’80s (not unlike Miuccia Prada, who put her family’s leather goods company on the map with black, parachute nylon backpacks a couple of years earlier). Ankoné also spent time as creative director of Savile Row’s Gieves & Hawkes. In 2007, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for services to the fashion industry.

Of the assembled designers, the winner was Francesc Grau Tomás of Spain. Ankoné says, “We chose Spain—the whole jury did—because we thought it was a very new idea to use sculpture on clothes. He did it in a very nice and interesting way.” The winning design was a floor-length smock with hillocks that resemble egg whites whipped into peaks, with a long jacket over the top featuring a mask on the back in relief. “It was the mask of an African tribe in Zaire,” Francesc explains. “It was a look towards the past, towards the naturalness of primitive tribes. And it was a play on words—the mask hiding fashion.” The impressive part is that the topographical elements identifiably form a face, and none of it is cumbersome. The model walks smoothly, and the garment exhibits remarkable fluidity while maintaining its shape. The garment also very much resembles this Jean Paul Gaultier wedding dress that uses the same idea.

The use of added dimensions continues to be explored now. The mask is evocative of the polygons seen in the current “art realism” or “new aesthetic” movement, which explores how things in the digital realm become real by either creating the illusion of depth with patterns and projection mapping, or creating topography with innovations in 3D patterning and 3D printing. For further reading on the subject (with multiple Pinterest examples), look to Joel Johnson’s study of the new aesthetic as it ties together fashion and video games or take a look at the gorgeous series in the “Digital T-shirt project” that features a sculpted wolf shirt that seems to reference Francesc’s mask more than twenty years later. You can also download 3D patterns as well.

For his undeniably avant-garde idea, Francesc won an 11-month course at Domus Fashion Academy in Milan (Vogue Japan’s Anna Dello Russo went there). He now teaches fashion design at Istituto Europeo di Design (IED) in Barcelona.

+ WATCH SMIRNOFF FASHION AWARD SHOW



Smirnoff Fashion Award Show | 'House Of Style' Collection On MTV Style

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 9

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , ,

cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford at the American 'Vogue' shoot with photographer Helmut Newton in Monte Carlo in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 10
Title: Fall '91
Original Airdate: 9/18/91
Appearances: Helmut Newton, Andre Leon Talley, Calvin Klein

DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: HELMUT NEWTON SHOOTS CINDY FOR 'VOGUE'

If the ’90s was the decade of supermodels, it was also the decade of super-photographers. The artistry of key figures like Herb Ritts, Bruce Weber, Steven Meisel, Ellen Von Unwerth and Helmut Newton contributed to the stratospheric rise of the glamazons while boosting the influence and acclaim of the fashion magazine. In this clip, we go to Monte Carlo, to the set of Cindy’s shoot for the November 1991 issue of American Vogue. Also on hand are photographer Helmut Newton and (then) creative director Andre Leon Talley. Cindy is in full high-fashion mode: Her hair is enormous, her body is brolic and she never once cracks a smile. She is there to work and shoot beautiful, hypersexualized photographs in Newton’s classic “King of Kink” style. “I wanted to do Helmut Newton photographs,” Cindy says. “I didn’t want him to photograph me looking like the Madonna. Not Madonna. The Madonna. Because he’s one of the few people who can get away with it and it doesn’t look raunchy.”

Cindy quickly sheds her all-American innocence. In one shot, she lies on the stage of a ballroom in a white bathing suit, twisting her body towards a blindfolded orchestra made up of old men in tuxedos. According to an interview with Newton, the image was designed to recreate a “chambre separée, when elegant people used to have private, elegant orgies.”

Another scene involves Cindy arching her back and scowling from a sweltering construction site, while hard-hatted crew dudes crane their necks to catch a glimpse. Yet another set-up has Cindy walk across a stone plaza in heels and a black bathing suit, hands outstretched against a cloudless blue sky, trailing a black veil. “[It’s a] photograph of Cindy with the swimsuit,” says Talley (who’s wearing an outfit befitting the glitzy principality: seersucker suit, sunglasses, a yellow straw cap and a matching neckerchief). “Then, suddenly, we put a tulle veil over it from Chanel and see her, like, maybe there is a sort of cinematic, theatrical glamour.” As with all Newton shoots, the magic is in the details. The added wisp of fabric creates a Felliniesque, 1960s European bombshell vibe, transforming our normally affable host.

If you’re familiar with Newton’s work but not the man, it’s surprising how unassuming he appears. He has a thing for loud, printed shirts. He wears a Hawaiian short sleeve one day and a shirt with an all-over print of small white dogs on another. But he has a decisive, Teutonic air when he shoots. He knows exactly how Cindy should “undulate” under the veil, and advises her on her form during the orchestra scene so as to keep the shot within the realm of “American decency.”

Watching Newton work is a revelation and a treat. It’s a lovely, rare opportunity to hear the photographer talk about himself instead of being studied and discussed. “I think that the only thing I’ve brought to fashion photography was a certain kind of sexuality,” he says. And referring back to Cindy’s comment about how Newton can shoot aggressive sex without tawdriness, the photographer attributes it to his palette. “Everything looks wonderful in black and white,” he says. “It is so pure, especially when it comes to photographing very daring, sexual images. I think that, in color, it becomes questionable.”

This segment again shows off Cindy’s range, despite her coloring, she submits to a quintessentially Newtonian aesthetic. Newton liked to take pictures of similar subjects and is most famous for his admiration of blondes. Writer Anthony Lane described Newton’s favorite sorts in The New Yorker (upon the release of Newton’s biography in September 2003) as “strapping Prussian nudes, their marble-hard limbs girt in sheer stockings and the pelts of severely endangered species…” Or else “glaciers with breasts.” As fashion fans will remember, this meant lots of pictures with six-foot model/ice queen Nadja Auermann. “Helmut was very clear that he liked a big girl and blonde girl, in an impeccable suit and high heels,” said Anna Wintour, in the 2004 Newton obituary that ran in the New York Times. "He would take that girl and put her in some wicked or naughty situation, kissing another woman or in handcuffs." Helmut Newton died in a car crash in Hollywood when he collided into a wall at the Chateau Marmont. He was 83.

+ WATCH HELMUT NEWTON AND CINDY CRAWFORD IN MONTE CARLO


DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: CALVIN KLEIN'S MILLION-DOLLAR DENIM CAMPAIGN

calvin klein

Designer Calvin Klein on his ad campaign with model Carré Otis in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Fashion advertising in the ’90s was exciting. You had the minimalist A Line ads from Anne Klein; the jarring, incendiary ads from Benetton; and the racially diverse ads from ESPRIT. Calvin Klein had been making headlines for his ad campaigns for decades, and would continue to do so in the decades following. For the 1991 October issue of Vanity Fair, Calvin Klein created an outrageously expensive ad campaign to promote his eponymous jeans line.

The series, shot by Bruce Weber, features a badass, curly-haired, full-lipped Carré Otis straddling a massive motorcycle on the streets of San Francisco. The camera shadows her day as the frontwoman of a fictional rock ’n roll band. We see Otis singing, stage-diving, and making out; Klein says he loved the images so much that, after selecting his favorites to use, he discovered that he had chosen 140 of them. The ad ran as a 116-page supplement to Vanity Fair, printed on the same paper stock as the magazine. Industry insiders at the time speculated that the ostentatious ad buy set the brand back $1 million.

+ WATCH CALVIN KLEIN ADVERTISING


DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: NAOMI WOLF AND CAMILLE PAGLIA ON EATING DISORDERS

naomi wolf

Naomi Wolf, author of 'The Beauty Myth,' participates in a discourse on beauty and feminism in 1991.
Photo: MTV

In this segment, MTV spoke with Naomi Wolf and Camille Paglia on the topic of eating disorders and the destructive effects of media in promulgating unrealistic beauty ideals.

While it would be easy to dismiss this as lip service to combat criticism of our role in promoting unhealthy body images, the footage is important when you consider MTV’s largely teenage viewership and how this segment predates an honest dialogue of airbrushing and Photoshop within the industry. We could not clear the clip due to issues with images and music, but we’ve transcribed quotes from Wolf and Paglia to highlight their stances on anorexia and fashion magazines as well as comments from Naomi Campbell and Jane Pratt. It’s an interesting moment when you consider the current criticism of pro-ana sites and the crackdown on “thinspo” on social networks like Tumblr and Pinterest. And it's also notable how most of these women focus on eating disorders as a white epidemic.

Naomi Wolf, Author of 'The Beauty Myth':
“Right now, a lot of people are telling women lies about what beauty is. The ideal we see in fashion magazines, for example: thin, white, young, surgically implanted. When you follow the advice of women's magazines, and follow one of these of these typical diets, it changes your brain chemistry and it addicts you, both physically and psychologically, to anorexia or bulimia.”

Camille Paglia, Professor of Humanities, University of the Arts, Philadelphia:
“Anorexia is the product of a particular kind of pushy, ambitious, socially upwardly mobile white family life. This idea of blaming it on the media is a sickness. It has got to stop. There is absolutely nothing wrong with pursuing beauty. The pursuit of beauty is a noble human aim.”

Wolf:
“As soon as women start reaching for power, there’s been a backlash. That’s the beauty myth. The beauty myth put in the place of happy housewife, this Vogue model, [which] says that no matter how successful you are in any aspect of your life, you have to look like that or you’re worthless.”

Paglia:
“The last ten years, career women have taken back the paraphernalia, the regalia, the armament of female sexuality. And we feel more powerful with it.”

Naomi Campbell:
“We, as models, use beauty when we climb. We start off in the beginning, and we get more successful or [we] don’t. And that’s, in a sense, using beauty to gain more power in a certain way.”

Jane Pratt, Editor-in-Chief of 'Sassy':
“The models are six feet tall, weigh 95 pounds, and they’re blonde and they have blue eyes. All of them. Women don’t look like that.”

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 10

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

cindy crawford richard gere

Cindy Crawford interviews actor and boyfriend Richard Gere at the Gianni Versace AIDS Benefit in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 11
Title: Best Of Edition
Original Airdate: 11/28/91
Includes segments from:

  • Cindy Hangs Out With Will Smith On The Set Of Fresh Prince (Episode 6)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Gianni Versace AIDS Fundraiser (Episode 7)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Cindy Crawford's 1991 Calendar Shoot (Episode 8 )
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , ,

jean paul gaultier

Designer Jean Paul Gaultier at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 3 Episode: 12
Title: Paris Edition
Original Airdate: 12/18/91
Appearances: Jean Paul Gaultier, Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, Karl Lagerfeld, Ellen Von Unwerth

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: JEAN PAUL GAULTIER IS AN ICON

From his TV interviews last fall with Lady Gaga to his current role as creative director of Diet Coke, few designers have become pop culture icons quite like Jean Paul Gaultier. It’s a marvel that the platinum-tressed couturier, who blazed onto the fashion scene in the '70s (he apprenticed under Pierre Cardin, launched his first prêt-à-porter collection in 1976 and went onto couture in 1999), has retained relevance and notoriety as the enfant terrible of the French fashion industry for over 30 years. In 1985, he introduced sharply cut, midi-length skirt suits for men; in the ’90s, he famously created the cone bra for Madonna’s Blonde Ambition tour. This year, the two tow-headed stars have joined forces again: Gaultier outfitted her Madgesty for the MDNA world tour.

In this segment, Cindy goes to Paris to discuss taboo, the origin of Gaultier's fixation with corsetry and his reasons for making gender-bending fashion. Jean Paul Gaultier is honest and affable with zero pretension and it’s easy to see why, all these decades later there’s still joy to be found in Gaultier’s designs. It's unsurprising that new and exciting talents like Gaga still clamor to work with him.

+ WATCH JEAN PAUL GAULTIER


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: LINDA EVANGELISTA

linda evangelista

Model Linda Evangelista in Chanel at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Maybe it’s because it’s the Paris fashion episode, or because it’s a couple of years after our first supermodel interview, but Linda is the first model we speak to who has a firm grasp on how famous she is. Also, it strikes me that she speaks in technical terms regarding her work not unlike an actor talking to James Lipton on Inside The Actor’s Studio. Linda always wanted to be a model, even as a child, and in this segment she makes the interesting claim that models—especially the supermodels of the time—are like actresses, except that they are captured in still images rather than moving pictures. It should also be noted that the distinction is important—some would go on to pursue successful acting careers and others would have more trouble with dialogue.

During the ’90s, as the names of models, photographers and even fashion editors became more well-known, the magazine cover was the domain of the model, and not of the actress, as it is these days. Linda cites her versatility as a reason she’s such a cover and ad campaign mainstay. Legendary photographer Steven Meisel (in a rare on camera interview) confirms this assessment, and praises how completely she immerses herself in each character. We see that a change in hair color and clothes alters her look drastically. Linda also says that her mercurial appearance makes up for her lack of “All-American appeal” since she doesn't have the “button nose” or the “wheat-colored hair” that was so popular when she was growing up in Ontario, Canada. It's funny because it never occurred to me that looking like Linda Evangelista could ever be a crutch. Especially in Ontario, Canada. JKJKJKJK.

+ WATCH LINDA EVANGELISTA


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: PARIS FASHION WEEK

paris fashion week

Model Naomi Campbell in hair and makeup backstage at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

We're backstage again, this time to unveil the secrets of Paris Fashion Week. There's a tangle of cameras jockeying for position on the press risers, and the close quarters reveal crews of models in various stages of preparation. Cindy dubs it as “glamorous as a supermarket sale,” and breaks down the math of how much the event costs: the invitations to “1800 fashion editors and 600 buyers in 42 countries,” the ushers, the location, the presents and, of course, the models. A single show can set a designer back $150,000, and the top-grossing girl can make upwards of $5,000 per show (this is, of course, in 1991 dollars and only an indication as to how much designers spend now). Christy Turlington justifies the math thusly: “When you look at it in terms of business and how much money we’re bringing in for companies, I think that our couple of thousand dollars are meager.” Karl Lagerfeld agrees: “They are the image-making persons of today," he says. "They are like the goddesses of the silent screen.”

Backstage, models are crammed beside racks, and everyone is smoking. On the runway for Spring 1992, we see frou-frou lace dusters for the pin-up, campy lingerie look. This is the year Chanel showed staid, predictable, box-suit silhouettes, but in cheeky pastel terry cloth. It’s also the season of Herve Leger’s first show. Michael Hutchence of INXS describes the prepping for such pageantry as “a hundred women getting ready for dinner—it’s terrifying.”

+ WATCH BACKSTAGE AT PARIS FASHION WEEK


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: ELLEN VON UNWERTH'S 'ITALIAN VOGUE' SHOOT

ellen von unwerth

Photographer Ellen Von Unwerth in 1991.
Photo: MTV

This is a beautiful, fun segment that illustrates at several points, the difference between a fashion editorial with actresses and one case with models. If you’ve ever been on-set for a celebrity fashion shoot, you can immediately see the difference. Models know what they look like. If you’ve ever seen America’s Next Top Model, you’ll know how challenging it is for a subject to look fantastic, while engaging in an activity and how critical it is to be able to command body language and facial expressions according to the demands of the photographer. It's in intuition, experience and anticipating that shutter snap. Here Karen Mulder plays a raven-haired Jane Russell and Eva Herzigova plays Marilyn Monroe. They romp around in cars, lounge in a hotel room, and pose with loads of cigarettes. The models are in their element.

Ellen's easy way with models may stem from her starting her career as one. A burgeoning interest in photography led to a campaign with British designer Katharine Hamnett. Ellen is generally considered one of the most dynamic photographers in the fashion industry (both then and now), and it’s fascinating to see how relaxed and personable she is behind the camera. She smiles a lot and her instructions are either casually gestured or a single word left open for interpretation (like "flamenco"), and you can see why, when you’re half naked on a set or in public, Ellen’s style might be confidence building. It’s also what gives Ellen Von Unwerth’s photographs an immensely voyeuristic appeal. She lets the actions run while she chooses what to capture. The end result is often like a scene from a movie, and this Italian Vogue spread that's inspired by the movie Gentlemen Prefer Blondes may be stylized in costume but appears totally spontaneous.

+ WATCH ELLEN VON UNWERTH


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 12

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , , , , , ,

House Of Style

House Of Style MTV Style House Of Style

About This Blog

MTV Style follows how people express themselves through fashion and beauty, from our favorite pop culture icons to you, the reader. We cover the fun, loud side of the industry with news, trends, interviews, videos, and more — MTV Style is fashion at full volume.

+ E-mail the editors: style@mtv.com
+ Follow us on Twitter:
@MTVstyle

+ Like us on Facebook:
Facebook.com/MTVstyle

+ Find us on Tumblr:
MTVstyle.Tumblr.com

+ Find us on Google+:
+MTVstyle


Editorial Director
Sophia Rai
Editor
Gaby Wilson
Editorial Assistant
Maeve Keirans
Editor-at-Large
Mary H.K. Choi

Featured Comment

I love these two as a couple. What a festive way to celebrate two important events in their life. Mariah looks like a dream.

Posted by Journey on Mariah Carey And Nick Cannon Shut Down Disneyland To Renew Vows In Cinderella-Themed Ensembles
©2014 Viacom International Inc. All Rights Reserved. MTV and all related titles and logos are trademarks of Viacom International Inc.