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cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford interviews photographer Gilles Bensimon at a photo shoot for 'Elle' magazine in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 37
Title: Romance Edition
Original Airdate: 2/14/95
Appearances: Gilles Bensimon, Bridget Hall, Morris Lapidus, Zoe Cassavetes, Adam Horovitz, Luscious Jackson, Toure

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: CINDY INTERVIEWS BRIDGET HALL, GILLES BENSIMON

By now, Cindy is a pro journo. While interviewing Bridget Hall, our host totally calls the young model out on being a hypocrite for telling girls to stay in school, since Bridget dropped out to make money. That's when things get real and they both bro down to talk about how grueling the job is.

With former Elle Magazine creative director and current America's Next Top Model photographer, Gilles Bensimon, Cindy is similarly about her business. She asks him how much control he exerts on set. He bristles at "control," explaining that his shoots are a collaborative experience and a group effort. Gilles maps out all of the looks beforehand, hiring a fit model to try on the outfits, which he then sketches to figure out if he likes the ensemble or not. This is an interesting contrast to the way Stephen Sprouse, Ellen Von Unwerth and Helmut Newton shoot.

Cindy has shot with Gilles for Elle covers before, and despite Gilles’s self-consciousness around our cameras, Cindy remarks that Gilles genuinely loves women. He looks slightly offended, as if she’s just called him pervy, but he's quickly disarmed. It’s nice to see Cindy so relaxed. Her hair is soft, she’s wearing a pastel cashmere tee with jeans, and she seems comfortable in her role as reporter. Gilles was formerly married to Elle MacPherson, but reality TV viewers may recognize him as the ex-husband to Kelly Killoren of The Real Housewives of New York City.

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD INTERVIEWS GILLES BENSIMON


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: TODD TIME WITH MORRIS LAPIDUS

todd oldham morris lapidus

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham interviews architect Morris Lapidus in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Todd continues to interview people who inspire him creatively. For this segment, he speaks to architect Morris Lapidus about his contributions to the South Beach skyline of Miami Beach. Morris, who studied architecture at Columbia, designed the Le Fountainbleu and the Eden Roc. His aesthetic has been called modern and post-modern, but for our purposes, that means swooping, curved lines, whimsical details and an exacting sense of humor. With Fountainbleu, he went “hog wild,” creating a giant curve to eschew the notion that buildings had to be rectangular.

Morris and Todd walk around Morris’s properties to pluck out details — like the bowtie pattern on floor tiles (a hat tip to Morris’s sartorial particularities), and how he hates certain patches of wallpaper for covering what was previously a beautiful mural. We already know how interior design influences Todd’s fashion designs, so it makes sense that Todd would want to talk to creators from this disciplines. Morris, who passed away in 2001, was a riot. He says he got rid of his generation's critics by outliving them, and cuts his own interview by telling us to stop rolling.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM TALKS ARCHITECTURE


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: ZOE CASSAVETES AND ADAM HOROVITZ GO VALENTINE'S DAY SHOPPING FOR IONE SKYE

adam horovitz

Adam Horovitz of the Beastie Boys goes Valentine's Day shopping for his wife Ione Skye in 1995.
Photo: MTV

As a kid, I thought it was awesome that Adam Horovitz was married to actress Ione Skye. Not only was it an example of two cultural worlds colliding (music and acting), it was awesome that two cool people in large cities felt compelled to marry so young. I thought it was SO romantic (less so now, ahem...). Ione, who you’ll also recognize as a model in the X-Girl show, seems chill, and the fact that Adam is unworried about what to get her for Valentine’s Day in this clip with Zoe Cassavetes is sort of fantastic. Everyone is being normal and relatable.

Zoe, at this point of the series, is our “youth culture correspondent,” and her IRL friendship with Adam makes a trip to Frederick’s of Hollywood for lingerie infinitely less awkward or annoyingly sexxxy. A sheer white marabou-feather-trimmed bed jacket and a black, vinyl trench coat (that you can totally tell Zoe's going to go back for) are considered too racy, so they swan off to a candy store.

There will be no heart-shaped Russell Stover box for Ione. Instead, they go to a bulk candy joint and go nuts with scoopfuls of jelly beans, chocolates, a Ring pop and an Astro pop. Then there’s a quick stop into a photo printing store, where Adam gets an I Dream Of Jeannie-themed picture of himself on a mirror, and his shopping is complete. The experience is low-fi and there's nothing that Adam bought that any college or high school kid couldn’t afford. It's too bad Ione bought him a diamond-encrusted Ducati Desmosedici RR superbike! JK. She didn't do that. Especially since he sold his gold helmet to buy her the mirror.

+ WATCH V-DAY SHOPPING WITH ADAM HOROVITZ


MUSIC AND FASHION: LUSCIOUS JACKSON GOES SHOPPING

luscious jackson

Luscious Jackson and Theo Kogan of the Lunachicks at Perfidia's Hair World in New York City in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Luscious Jackson was an all-female group signed to the Beasties’ label Grand Royal. You may remember “Naked Eye,” the first single from their second album, Fever In Fever Out. Or “Here,” on the Clueless soundtrack. They disbanded only to reunite in 2011. This segment was filmed a full two years before they would hit it big in the Billboard charts in 1997, and it’s cool to see the ladies in their hometown of New York, and finding out what stores they frequent.

It’s awesome to get to see the original Perfidia’s Hair World in Patricia Field’s former location on 8th Street. The musicians are outfitted with enormous, stylized pieces: a look for a retro stewardess, rainbow layers, Wynonna Judd hair. You may recognize the aplomb and potential for humor when you realize that Perfidia of Perfidia’s Hair World was also responsible for Jerri Blank’s hair on the Amy Sedaris TV show Strangers With Candy. So classic.

We then run into the incomparable Theo Kogan of Lunachicks (and now Theo and The Skyscrapers), who looks sensational in massive strappy platform heels and socks, a tiny black and white dress, enormous red hair, and a head band that features wire bunny ears that predates Marc Jacobs’s bunny ears for Louis Vuitton, which Madonna famously wore at the 2009 Met Gala.

The group then goes thrift shopping at Housing Works, a charity shop that benefits homeless people in New York living with HIV and AIDS. The girls buy cardigans and puffy ski jackets that express their love of orange and beige. Then it’s a surprising trip to Brooks Brothers, where they pick up mixed-pattern shirts and clashing, hyper-preppy argyle sweaters, because menswear lasts longer and is often cheaper than comparable ladies’ clothes. It’s a lesson in perspective; counter-culture clothing can sometimes just be mainstream stuff flipped on its head.

+ WATCH LUSCIOUS JACKSON GOES SHOPPING


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: AROMATHERAPY IS EN VOGUE

toure

Massage and aromatherapy with TV personality and novelist Touré in 1995.
Photo: MTV

This is a Valentine’s Day themed package on essential oils, but it’s also a reminder of how aromatherapy dominated the marketplace in the mid-‘90s. There wasn’t a gift shop in the world that didn’t sell a diffuser, and we all suddenly knew about the effects of sandalwood and what ylang ylang was. Admittedly, part of the reason why I wanted to share this footage is that it includes a very young Touré.

The Rolling Stone contributor, novelist and TV pop culture pundit learns about acupressure and reflexology from the comfort of a bathrobe and speaks in soothing tones as he is massaged in the cover of candlelight. It’s all very ’90s, back when we thought alternative therapies and not standing desks would SAVE OUR LIVES.

+ WATCH AROMATHERAPY


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: SOFIA COPPOLA LAUNCHES MILKFED

sofia coppola

Sofia Coppola at the fashion show for her clothing line Milkfed in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Did you know that Milkfed was still being sold in Japan? No idea what the hell a Milkfed even is? Back in 1994, before she was an Oscar-winning director, Sofia launched a clothing brand. She started out with logo and graphic tees (you'll see a SUPER early version of the Che Geuvara joint in our footage) and I recall being especially fond of their tanks because there were super flattering at the arm and didn't give you armpit fat even if you were wearing the wrong bra.

Milkfed also made cut-and-sew items like A-line minis and simple pinafores and even if Sofia talks about her designing shortcomings (she does NOT consider herself a designer), this ex-Chanel intern definitely knows her audience. All of her clothes were affordable without being mainstream, like, the GAP and she simply made clothes that she and her friends liked that couldn't be found in stores. Boom.

+ WATCH SOFIA COPPOLA


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 37

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linda evangelista

Model Linda Evangelista in Chanel at Paris Fashion Week in 1991.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 38
Title: Best Of Edition (March Model Madness)
Original Airdate: 3/14/95
Includes segments from:

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kate moss jon stewart linda evangelista

MTV correspondent Jon Stewart backstage with models Kate Moss and Linda Evangelista at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 39
Title: New York Fashion Week
Original Airdate: 4/11/95
Appearances: Jon Stewart, Kate Moss, Linda Evangelista, Calvin Klein, Tatjana Patitz, Simon LeBon, Todd Oldham, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Elle MacPherson

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: JON STEWART GOES BACKSTAGE AT CALVIN KLEIN

Jon Stewart is his delightful, funny self at New York Fashion Week as he goes backstage at Calvin Klein and attends rehearsal. We’ve accompanied House of Style to several Fashion Weeks in New York by now, so we have a frame of reference for how our new host is being treated. Jon is regarded with suspicion, and we seem to be getting less access than when we’re with Cindy since she often walks in the shows she covers. He interviews Calvin Klein and the designer treats the comedian like an interloper. It's not total side eye with daggers but it's definitely screw-mouth emoji.

Jon, to his credit, stays cracking the jokes, pointing out the loose butane canister among the makeup and commenting on sleeping models backstage. It’s observational humor run amok, and we don’t learn anything new or servicey but it's hilarious. Jon is bowled over, understandably, by Kate Moss, and slinks over to her and Linda Evangelista, who have cracked open a bottle of champagne to toast the end of the week. You can’t help wondering if Cindy called ahead to ask them to be nice to the new guy.

+ WATCH JON STEWART BACKSTAGE AT CALVIN KLEIN


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: TATJANA PATITZ

tatjana patitz

Model Tatjana Patitz at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Tatjana Patitz talks about how she only uses nondescript duffel bags to cart her Fashion Week stuff because the fancy luggage tends to get stolen. Good tip if you had any designs on becoming a world-traveling supermodel. It’s interesting to see what a model packs since she’ll be wearing other people’s clothes for such a large part of the week, so this is a peek into what Tatjana will be wearing to dinner and parties. There are a number of pretty Tocca dresses, bright bras and Manolo heels.

So far, this episode has given us a renewed sense of how much models loathe working Fashion Week. We’ve heard countless stories about how they'd rather do editorial, how exhausted they are during show weeks and Tatjana even admits that every time she tells herself, "Never again." We shadow Tatjana at Betsey Johnson and Todd Oldham, and then follow her to events with the likes of Molly Ringwald, RuPaul and the ever-present patron saint of the rockstar supermodelizer, Simon LeBon.

+ WATCH TATJANA PATITZ


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: HOW TO BUILD A TODD OLDHAM FASHION SHOW

todd oldham

Finale of the Todd Oldham runway show at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Todd, ever the gracious host, opens his Fashion Week show to us with unparalleled access and hospitality. A mere 3 hours before his show, he is energized and not at all pitching a fit or freaking people around him with stressball energies the way some other designers would be. He wears a shrunken polo shirt with a long-sleeved tee underneath it and takes time out to talk to us about the months leading up to this moment. First he created the custom prints and embroideries, then he determined silhouettes, and finally he moved on to fine-tuning. There are typically 3-5 outfits per girl with a fitting for each. He shouts out his show producer Kevin Cryer, and we see the seating chart and have a new appreciation for the logistical nightmare that is a fashion show.

Twenty minutes before the show starts, Todd and Kevin go through the timing of the lights, the music and the order the girls will walk in. A quick visit to makeup with wizard Kevyn Aucoin shows us that the artist is taking brows to the next level by affixing a pair of slick, black vinyl ones on a stunningly young Tyra Banks. During Todd’s commentary about the various things that need to get accomplished, he mentions interviews that are required of him backstage, does one, and then returns to us moments before the first walk.

There’s clapping and last-minute details. Even during the walk, Todd allows our cameras to stay with him. He points out with interesting details and even has a model remove her lumpy undergarments, which he sticks into his back pocket. We’ve talked to Cindy during shows, but a designer’s stakes are different and this is the closest we’ve been to the enormous pressure.

Just minutes later it’s over. The leathers, stripes, metallic brocades, sequins and quilted satins are well-received by no less than Ivana Trump and Susan Sarandon. A broken heel sends Todd into peals of laughter. We watch models as they ask to borrow clothes for various parties, and we have a new appreciation of Todd for his kindness and cool demeanor.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM PUTS ON A FASHION SHOW


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: WHAT IT'S LIKE FOR A BUYER

seventeen magazine

'Seventeen' magazine Fashion Editor Marie Moss at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

With Cindy, we’ve sat front row and learned what it’s like to wear the hat of a fashion editor, but the other person who is politically entitled to prominent placement in the seating arrangement is the buyer. Here we talk to Kim Koshiol, buyer at Bloomingdales, and compare her experiences with those of Marie Moss, the senior fashion editor at Seventeen. This is a new target age group for us, and an important one since we're MTV so it’s interesting to note how high-fashion trends are adaptable for the teen fashion world.

When shopping for a department store, the entire collection must be considered for its overall appeal, price and quality. Instead of matching themes for an editorial shoot, the line has to be featured together on the sales floor, so cohesiveness must be considered.

For the fashion editor, trends across several different designers have to gel so that story ideas can be developed throughout the season and honed through additional showroom visits. What the 16 and 17-year-old girl will take away from the runway differs from the response of an older more affluent customer and styles need to assessed based on what will trickle down.

We interview designer Yeohlee Teng, who mentions that the fashion editor and buyer work in tandem. You need the editors in order to get your message out, and you need the buyers to get the clothes out. Longevity has to be considered. Betsey Johnson has good relationships with her buyers, and though her eponymous line recently filed for bankruptcy (much to our dismay) her runway trends have always resonated with The Youngs.

Most of the trends are texturally — or color-driven — basically, nothing that can't be mimicked across price points. For fall, it’s mixed textures, matching matte with shine, leather with suede, and the color brown. Betsey, of course, bucks trends, and makes a major play for hyper-color cowgirl.

+ WATCH FASHION WEEK FOR BUYERS


RISE OF THE SUPERMODELS: FASHION CAFÉ

fashion cafe

Models Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell and Elle MacPherson at the opening of The Fashion Café in 1995.
Photo: MTV

In 1995, Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schiffer, Christy Turlington and Elle MacPherson opened a restaurant devoted to fashion in Rockefeller Center. It was during the heyday of Hard Rock, and models were still fetching multimillion-dollar deals, so it’s understandable that naming plates of shrimp after beautiful women and showing runway footage while peddling buffalo wings wasn’t immediately noticed as being a total fiasco.

We know now that the investors were shady, and a couple of years later would be indicted as money launderers, but even in food critic Ruth Reichl’s write up for the New York Times, she nails the major problem with the business model: Fashion imagery makes you feel conflicted about eating middle-of-the-road bar food and Oreo-branded cheesecake. During the launch party, we admire displays of jewelry, iconic dresses and David Copperfield’s hair while he talks about how stoked he is (UM, remember when he and Claudia were engaged for a zillion years?). Something about the intersection of these factors and a ominous quote from music and fashion legend Malcolm McLaren (i.e. “[this is] probably the end of fashion as we know it”) makes for a vivid jumping-the-shark moment for the ’90s Supermodel. The Fashion Café would close three years later, but not before Naomi renounced her involvement by refusing to appear at events or be caught dead in the midtown restaurant. A promotional leather jacket from Fashion Café cost $1,500, whereas the most expensive item on the menu would set you back $18.95.

+ WATCH FASHION CAFÉ


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: BAD ETIQUETTE AT SHOWS

sibyl buck

Model Sibyl Buck gives her opinion on bad fashion show etiquette at New York Fashion Week in 1995.
Photo: MTV

This is the turning point in our Fashion Week coverage, as House of Style keeps it all too real regarding the drawbacks of the event. There are definitely some ugly moments in championing beautiful design, and we actually get to hear how loud it is in the press risers and backstage at the show. Wavy-haired, power-drunk producers and security people are rude and flagrantly abusive. People get trampled as spectators exit and enter the spaces. We even hear from Sibyl Buck that she and other models suspect designers of recycling used G-strings, and there’s a moment of Sandra Bernhard losing her mind at Michael Musto on the topic of sexuality. After the mayhem, however, everyone comments on how low-key this season has been compared to others. We get the impression that Fashion Week is like childbirth. Everyone forgets how excruciating it all is the moment it’s over.

+ WATCH FASHION WEEK ETIQUETTE


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: TRENDS OF FALL 1995

marc jacobs

Marc Jacobs had the best suits of the Fall 1995 collections.
Photo: MTV

It’s all about the headkerchief in every fabric from cotton to leather. The models at Miu Miu are morose. Marc Jacobs and other designers celebrate the lady and show a great deal of shrewdly cut suits without any of the vestigial influence of the ’80s power suit. There is, of course, the deeply upsetting ubiquity of the most fuggo shoe silhouette from the mid-’90s: the calf-length boot with a kitten heel. Barf. Also, CANKLES.

+ WATCH '95 FALL FASHION SHOWS


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 39

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helmut newton

Photographer Helmut Newton and 'Vogue' magazine Creative Director Grace Coddington in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 40
Title: Swimsuit Edition
Original Airdate: 5/23/95
Appearances: Helmut Newton, Grace Coddington, Eva Herzigova

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: HELMUT NEWTON'S EVA HERZIGOVA 'VOGUE' SHOOT

Helmut Newton is as much a household name as his models, and here we find him shooting again for American Vogue with legendary creative director Grace Coddington. In every way, this is a study in contrasts, and with Helmut, an entire shoot can hinge on him riffing on an image. For his notes on this shoot with Eva Herzigova (notably and unsurprisingly another Aryan-looking ice queen of a subject), he simply had the notion that he would oil her up and she would look like a young Greek goddess. He admits that he’s strayed from his original idea as the shoot progressed, and though you can see hints at Grecian cues in her blonde hair, curled and pinned at the base of her neck, that’s where all intentions fly out the door. It’s fascinating to see Helmut’s brain work, and he explains that inspiration for him is all about a “point of departure.” Were he to wait for the “divine spark to move Helmut,” he says, “we would have to wait and that other positions presented themselves.”

It’s amazing to watch how Helmut works, especially since he’s so articulate and aware of his process. Ellen von Unwerth, for instance, comes from a place of having modeled, and can evoke certain candid, sexy moods by remaining unobtrusive while encouraging girls to play as naturally as possible. With Gilles Bensimon, it’s an exercise in planning, deliberation and showcasing his admiration for women, and while Helmut clearly loves women too, his methods are about projecting fantasies from his own psyche. His point of view and perversions are very much his, and the process is far less collaborative; he talks about how mechanical and precise the resulting photos are. He asks Eva several times to move her fingers slightly or change the placement of a hand. It’s not a flurry of shots as much as it is changing details until he has exactly what he wants.

Helmut says that no aspect of his shoot is about intellectual instruction, but he is shrewd about the fashion photography climate. He abstains from red lipstick because it’s boring; he says he’s easily bored because he’s superficial and has no attention span. He rails against his critics because he thinks that political and social analyses of his photographs miss the point, yet he obviously knows exactly what feelings he’ll evoke, since he’s careful in sullying Eva’s otherwise pristine image by keeping the soles of her feet filthy, and by calling himself politically incorrect.

Helmut Newton is a boon to fashion photography, and even though there are plenty of talented photographers who are still around, there’s something about his very specific voice that I miss. While it’s awesome that technology has democratized fashion photography in terms of barrier to entry with easy-to-use DSLRs and the proliferation of fashion blogs, it’s heartbreaking that there are so few forums for truly romanticized fashion editorials that show off strong voices. The drama has suffered somewhat in favor of technical or journalistic photographs that show how Italian men layer or tie their scarfs or how kids on the street dress, and while candid shots have their merit, I can’t help thinking we have a long way to go before budgets like these will be supported for online-exclusive content without it being an ad campaign, or designed by an agency to look like an editorial. A lot of U.S. fashion editorials these days exist to illustrate a service or glamorize what’s essentially a clothing catalog, and it straight bums me out.

+ WATCH HELMUT NEWTON SHOOTS EVA HERZIGOVA


POP CULTURE AND FASHION: DAISY FUENTES'S SWIMSUIT SHOOT

This is sorta like the Cindy shoot in Mexico and predates MTV regular Daisy Fuentes becoming our host by two years, but it's interesting to compare the two calendars. Both of them were concerned about what this means for their image but recognize how important it is for their careers to acknowledge the dude-fans. Daisy opts for a female photographer which alters the dynamic somewhat.

+ WATCH DAISY FUENTES' SWIMSUIT SHOOT


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: SWIMSUITS IN NYC

This season’s swimsuit trends range from metallic, detachable marabou feather trim, vintage cuts that resemble bras and girdles, and this newfangled stuff like looks like patent leather but is actually breathable and waterproof. To illustrate this, we’ve got a pair of models posing on fire escapes, using payphones, standing in front of fire hydrant spray and fixing motorcycles. It’s all a bit confusing and very much reminds me of hilarious stock footage on Getty. It’s basically women laughing alone with salad.

+ WATCH SEXY SWIMSUITS


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 40

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walk like a runway model

A participant walks like a runway model at a New Jersey mall in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 41
Title: Best Of Edition (How-To Tutorials)
Original Airdate: 6/6/95
Includes segments from:

  • How To Walk Like A Runway Model (Episode 13)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • How To Accessorize For $1.98 (Episode 25)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • How To Relax With Aromatherapy (Episode 37)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

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elizabeth berkley

Inside 'Showgirls' star Elizabeth Berkley's closet in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 42
Title: Back To School Edition
Original Airdate: 9/11/95
Appearances: Elizabeth Berkley, Stephanie Seymour, Veronica Webb, Victoria Bartlett, Stephen Sprouse

DEMOCRATIZATION OF STYLE: A CLOSET TOUR WITH ELIZABETH BERKLEY

If you grew up watching Saved by the Bell and knew Elizabeth Berkley as Jessie Spano, you were probably deeply curious to see how she’d fare as the lead in the Paul Verhoeven movie Showgirls. The film is a campy celebration of Vegas debauchery, schlocky acting, eating dog food, and full frontal nudity, with a lot of explicit sex.

We catch up with Elizabeth Berkley a few weeks before the release of the NC-17 cult classic, and you can tell she’s eager for the image change. She’s ready to shed the do-gooding, overachieving high-school version of herself, and is very much dressing the part. She shows off the difference between the flannel shirts, jeans and boots (or her “Midwest look” as she calls it) that she keeps in her closet for her visits home, and seems proud of her vinyl trouser collection. She’s partial to shiny clothing in general, as we see when she models a shocking red color vinyl trench.

Elizabeth talks about how much she loves Betsey Johnson floral dresses, and then plays dress-up in a shrunken sweater and pencil skirt, and later in a long red satin “chinois” dress with a slit to the thigh. She considers the first an homage to Old Hollywood glamour, and then muses that the red dress is a good option for a date. She’s in man-eater mode as she discusses stripper heels, and while this is all an exhibition to highlight how she’s changed, the earnestness is endearing. As a viewer you have mixed feelings and feel slightly protective of how she seems unaware that she’s just starred in a hilarious and highly entertaining porno.

+ WATCH ELIZABETH BERKLEY'S CLOSET


DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: THE FIRST VICTORIA'S SECRET FASHION SHOW

victoria's secret fashion show

The first Victoria's Secret Fashion Show in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Long before Adam Levine performances, million-dollar bras and winged angels who commanded hefty checks to walk in a show televised to millions of viewers on network television, there was the very first Victoria’s Secret fashion show. The goal was simple: to bring the popular lingerie and clothing catalog to life.

It looks like a tasteful trunk show in some regards. Held at New York’s Plaza Hotel, the models are elegant and recognizable: We speak with catalog mainstays Frederique, Stephanie Seymour and Veronica Webb about the goings-on. They’re dutifully respectful and appreciative of the efforts taken to produce the show. We speak to a Victoria’s Secret executive briefly as well, and while the company has been enormously successful in building the entertainment value of show in subsequent years, the most interesting thing about this dialed-down, straightforward production is the styling.

Victoria Bartlett, the stylist, is a genius, and it’s no wonder she went on to be the fashion editor of Allure, the fashion director of Interview and a designer in her own right with the creation of VPL (and the diffusion line VPL2 that counts Victoria Beckham, Gwen Stefani and Tilda Swinton among its fans). It’s no small feat to create a mood or an entire lifestyle around lingerie, and Bartlett pairs matching bra and panty sets with robes and cardigans and even re-imagines slips and half-slips as dresses and skirts by pairing them with shoes, handbags, cuffs and gloves.

The trend is one we’ve seen before, but taking “underwear as outerwear” and making it work for a somewhat conservative client is a shrewdly navigated balancing act. None of the slips betray a sluttiness that a grunge take on the trend would’ve evoked. This is carefully executed fashion for the mainstream, and the key here is skewing ladylike and respectable by keeping things slightly costumey (no one is wearing a baby tee with bikini panties, a handbag and driving gloves to work) with an sustained seriousness.

+ WATCH BACKSTAGE AT THE FIRST VICTORIA'S SECRET FASHION SHOW


STEPHEN SPROUSE STYLES THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME MUSEUM

stephen sprouse

Designer Stephen Sprouse visits the Rock N' Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Stephen Sprouse once again bridges the gap between fashion and music by taking on the very specific job of styling the mannequins that will stand in the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame Museum in Cleveland. Interestingly enough, you don’t have to be inducted to appear in the museum, and Sprouse uses this to pick and choose his favorites for the contemporary music section. It’s marvelous to have a fashion and music nerd with a clear sense of taste to curate the museum, and he’s obviously thrilled at the prospect of dispatching a team of museum-caliber preservationists to protect random stains on the destroyed rock tees. That man-hours will be devoted to maintaining the integrity of snot, blood and beer stains is kinda thrilling.

Mannequins created to exactly resemble riot girl members of L7 have their roots dyed dark on artificial hair to mimic their style precisely. Plastic baby barrettes from the dollar store are flown in and then meticulously clipped according to drawings sent by the musicians, and we even have anatomically correct mannequins (they have penises instead of a Ken doll bump) to fill skintight pants.

There are outfits from Elton John, The Fat Boys, Sid Vicious (Stephen is quick to point out the Sex label on his original Vivienne Westwood bondage pants) and Debbie Harry. The Debbie Harry dress is the first thing he’d ever made for her, and he reminisces that he’d cut the dress so short that it had to be weighted down with safety pins. There are shell-toes from Run-DMC and a tab of acid from Janis Joplin; Sprouse idles on the mannequin of Trent Reznor, who will be covered in real mud in upcoming weeks to evoke his mud-slung performance at Woodstock. It’s thrilling to get to see what it takes to be a curator (a term that in this case is used correctly) for such an anthropologically exacting exhibit, and Sprouse looks like a kid in a candy store.

+ WATCH STEPHEN SPROUSE ROCK N' ROLL HALL OF FAME


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 42

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kurt loder

MTV News anchor Kurt Loder gets a 'House of Style' makeover from designer John Bartlett in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 43
Title: Fall Edition
Original Airdate: 10/16/95
Appearances: Kurt Loder, Tommy Hilfiger, Betsey Johnson, John Bartlett, Kate Moss, Chris Farley, Bruce Willis, Demi Moore, Scott Wolf, Oprah Winfrey, Naughty by Nature

DEMOCRATIZING FASHION: KURT LODER'S MAKEOVER

Giving MTV’s baritone news authority, Kurt Loder, a makeover sounds innocent and straightforward enough, but this piece rules ups the ante because the designers show up to do the styling themselves. House of Style has gotten popular enough on its own merit that we no longer go onto the field to visit with designers in their natural habitats in order to create a documentary-feel to the story. We rarely see Loder in this light, so that’s fun, but the takeaway is that designers—Tommy Hilfiger, Betsey Johnson, and John Bartlett—are asked to present their collections and their personalities. Not only are they being judged on the merits of their clothes, but their eponymous brands need to convey character as well. It introduces a competitive aspect that makes this a significant precursor to industry-specific reality TV. This is Project Runway being born, not to mention the fashion-acting double threat (Rachel Zoe, Nicole Richie, Jessica Simpson, Lauren Conrad, Whitney Port). Kurt Loder dressed in Betsey Johnson faux fur coats is entertaining for sure, and who doesn’t love the maxi-madras print of a John Bartlett suit? But this “treating Kurt Loder like a paper doll” gag means more to future trends in broadcast and transparency. Plus, Kurt Loder’s hair has never looked more amazing.

+ WATCH KURT LODER'S MAKEOVER


RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: KATE MOSS ON HER BOOK, 'KATE'

kate moss

Model Kate Moss launches her book, 'Kate' in 1995.
Photo: MTV

It’s a huge deal that the locus of power shifted to allow an art book to be based on the popularity of the model and not the brand name of a photographer. Publishers are approaching models at the time this episode was produced, and Kate Moss’s book spans the past five years of her burgeoning career. In this segment, we show Kate walking around a room filled with her photographs, and some of her more notorious tabloid clippings. The wall display, which may have been arranged for a launch party, is interesting because it allows Kate Moss the model to talk about Kate the image with a greater sense of distance.

That fracturing of self is interesting. It’s akin to Helmut talking about his himself in the third person or when Beyoncé performs as Sasha Fierce. It’s subtle, but instead of asking models what their life philosophies are or how long things take at shows, we get an insight into the 19-year-old mind of a very young and very famous model through her own testimony about how she regards her face. She’s incredibly insightful and unguarded. Kate notes that photographers often don’t like to show her smiling, and that she loves seeing how her image changes according to the shot because she likes when she can’t recognize herself. “It’s not really me,” she says of the pages in her book. “They’re just images that the photographers portray me as.”

Kate seems well-adjusted despite her infamy and the heightened scrutiny from British papers (their press then being the equivalent to our tabloids and TMZ now), and doesn’t seem to feel any real ownership of the version of herself being portrayed by Helmut Newton, Peter Lindbergh and Nick Knight. “They don’t see who you are,” she says. “The more visible they make you, the more invisible the true you is.”

+ WATCH KATE MOSS' BOOK


FAMOUS PEOPLE GET IMPATIENT WITH FLEA MARKET QUESTIONS

jean claude van damme

Actor Jean Claude Van Damme and Darcy LaPier share their favorite flea market find in 1995.
Photo: MTV

This is awesome because it’s a classic case of hitting a press line for an event with a question that famous people are not remotely interested in answering. We’ve included the clip here mostly so you can see a young Scott Wolf, as well as Bruce Willis and Demi Moore as a couple. The question is: What’s the last thing you got at a flea market? It serves as an interesting litmus test for how much patience people have and what they think of MTV. Chris Farley asks us “what we’re on.” Jean Claude Van Damme tells us it’s a stupid question. Alice Cooper, Little Richard and Oprah, on the other hand, are extremely patient and professional.

+ WATCH CELEBRITY FLEA MARKET FINDS


MUSIC AND FASHION: SHOPPING IN JERSEY WITH NAUGHTY BY NATURE

naughty by nature

Shopping with Treach of Naughty by Nature in Newark, New Jersey in 1995.
Photo: MTV

We hit up Newark with East Orange’s finest, Treach and Vin Rock of Naughty By Nature. We visit their store, which sells their in-house line, Naughty Gear. This is most like the Luscious Jackson shopping segment in that we get to check out stores the rappers would normally spend time in. They give us advice on how to layer oversized clothing, and it’s all very sincere and servicey, but the best part has to be when Vin and Treach call out local designers — including April Walker of Walker Wear, and Brother Mac One, who has an airbrushed T-shirt atelier.

Most of America may only know the group as a one- or two-hit wonder, but these guys made a huge impact within the rap community (seriously, see how often Treach’s name comes up as rappers’ top rappers), so for Treach and Vinnie to extol the virtues of returning to your neighborhood to promote local business is a huge deal. “When it came time for us to put up a business,” says Vin, “we wanted to start in here, back in the hood. Hopefully, it can encourage other people around the way to put their business here.”

It’s an earnest, credible gesture, so it’s no surprise that they would want to show off their neighborhood to MTV viewers. We go to a shoe store, where the two buy boots, and then we even go to their local hardware store to get a real-life length of industrial chain and a padlock. These guys weren’t about wearing diamond flooded necklaces; they wore chains and brought House of Style along with them to Jersey Janitorial Supplies to prove it. The chains and the padlock pendant signify that their thoughts are with those doing time in jail.

+ WATCH NAUGHTY BY NATURE GOES SHOPPING


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 43

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las vegas showgirls

Makeup tips from Las Vegas showgirls in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 44
Title: Las Vegas Edition
Original Airdate: 11/27/95
Appearances: Las Vegas showgirls

DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: MAKEUP TIPS FROM SHOWGIRLS

With regard to beauty, there are two schools of thought amongst Vegas showgirls: eyebrows or no eyebrows. In this segment, we visit Las Vegas and go backstage to reveal makeup secrets of showgirls. None of them is applicable to real life (back in 1995 or now) unless you’re giving showgirl realness as a very well-blended drag queen, but it’s fascinating to see the tricks and shortcuts applied to a faceful of powders, creams and colors. Some girls swear by removing their brows because they like to vary the shape and color according to the mood required in the show. An arch denotes anger or tempestuousness, while a rounder curve indicates that the character is more subdued. Some even use a red lip pencil as liner on their lids and lips in order to match.

Whether your brows are drawn in or not, makeup time can run anywhere form 20 minutes to over an hour, and the advice varies from not having your eyeliner extend past your brow to having a “mobile mole”: a traveling beauty spot that disguises blemishes. It’s captivating to watch makeup routines that are enacted in the cloistered environment of a Las Vegas show, since they’re totally unrelated to the trends of the time. You may find the painstaking results appealing or garish, but you can’t knock the effort.

+ WATCH SHOWGIRL MAKEUP TIPS


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: LAS VEGAS SPECIALTY BOUTIQUES

At first you'd think this would be a segment that would be more at home on a travel show, especially given the butch, gravelly voiceover but the bit I love is that we visit with Ms. Rita Hart at Quality Liquidators where they sell furniture from closed down hotels and casinos (and please also check out Rita's windbreaker ensemble because it's amazing), Stephen C. Serge, the proprietor of Serge's Showgirl Wigs and Mordechai Yerushalmi a.k.a. Jeweler to the Stars. It's exactly the sort of anthropologically marvelous stuff I'd want to hit up if I visited a touristy spot. Plus, we've got a clip of Marty Scorsese talking watches.

+ WATCH LAS VEGAS HISTORY


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: TODD GOES TCHOTCHKE SHOPPING

Trust Todd Oldham to hit up Las Vegas in doubled up animal print (python satin shirt and leopard print pants) to shop at the "largest emporium of crap." We look at numerous wedding-themed bauble, every manner of Elvis gee-gaw and a slew of naked lady pens.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM SHOP IN LAS VEGAS


DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: THE SPRING '96 RUNWAYS

The middle of the decade showed strong color, pattern, and texture for spring. Neons, lurid burn out patterned velvet, lace, sequins, ostrich feathers, plaids, stripes, and a ton of zebra print. Silhouettes were either mega diaphanous like slinky satin and clingy chiffon or else super structured with denim and khaki showing up in everything from suiting to onesies. Baby tees and halters continued to rage (they'd be big all through the '90s) and navel gazed all the exposed midriffs from Anna Sui to Gaultier and even Chanel. Knee-shorts were hot but hot pants were hotter, but the takeaway might be that white-girl cornrows and dreads were a thing and that's just real :(

+ WATCH SPRING '96 FASHION WEEK SHOWS


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 44

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cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford at the 'House of Style' goodbye party in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 45
Title: Cindy's Last Show
Original Airdate: 12/18/95
Appearances: Anna Sui, Todd Oldham, Kurt Loder, Kevyn Aucoin

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: CINDY LEAVES 'HOUSE OF STYLE'

For most of us, Cindy Crawford was the most memorable House of Style host, so it’s with a heavy heart that we bid farewell to the supermodel as she turns 30. I only bring up her age because she does, and in this segment from Cindy’s going-away party, she jokes that it’s not that she’s too good for videotape (she was pursuing a film career at the time), but that she’s too old for it. True to Cindy’s low-key style, she tries on a number of dresses that were called in for the occasion, but ends up wearing her own clothes. Her cropped shirt and pants are Gucci and her glam squad chat as she gets ready.

Cindy arrives alone, cracking jokes the whole time, and checks in with designer and HOS regular Anna Sui. Losing a longtime host can be a tumultuous change for a show, and the two talk about the impact House of Style has had on the fashion community. “Well, I think it’s brought fashion into the home,” says Sui. “I think it’s given us the recognition that we probably never would have gained without being on. And I think it’s given us a whole new audience.”

Another show favorite, makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin, talks about his favorite moment: the time Todd Oldham interviewed him. He mentions how pleased he was that he’d kissed Todd on the cheek and that the moment hadn’t been edited out. Cindy then checks with her MTV family—Kurt Loder, Doug Herzog (head of programming at the time), and Frankie the cameraman. Cindy cites her own favorite moments: clowning around with Tracey Ullman, getting teased by Will Smith, Naomi Campbell applying zit cream to her face, and going shopping with Duran Duran at Sears.

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD'S HIGHLIGHTS AS A HOST ON 'HOUSE OF STYLE: MUSIC, MODELS, AND MTV'


It is the end of the era, in that Cindy Crawford’s ascension to stardom coincided with the first couple of years of House of Style. The big-haired, bodacious, buxom goddess is no longer the desirable aesthetic ideal of the late ’80s and the early ’90s. Shoulder pads have been traded for flannel shirts, the supermodel has been usurped by the waif, musicians and skaters are making fashion and power has shifted from the European runways to the street. It’s sad to see Cindy go, but it’s exciting to see what's next.

+ WATCH CINDY'S FAVORITE 'HOUSE OF STYLE' MOMENTS


DEMYSTIFYING STYLE: CINDY CRAWFORD'S BLOOPER REEL

cindy crawford

An outtake from Cindy's tenure as host of 'House of Style.'
Photo: MTV

Being a host can have a slew of hilarious moments. Watch Cindy’s evolution as a television host in a series of outtakes, from spaz-outs to laughing fits to getting bundled up in massive blankets between takes. Note that, by the end, Cindy 86es some of the more “cheesy” stuff.

+ WATCH CINDY'S BLOOPER REEL


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 45

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Featured Comment

I love these two as a couple. What a festive way to celebrate two important events in their life. Mariah looks like a dream.

Posted by Journey on Mariah Carey And Nick Cannon Shut Down Disneyland To Renew Vows In Cinderella-Themed Ensembles
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