mtv Style is moving! come with us to mtv news »
House Of Style

Browse By

House Of Style

Follow Us

  1. Get the latest updates in your favorite RSS feed reader.

kate moss

Model Kate Moss in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Season: 5 Episode: 19
Title: Winter Edition
Original Airdate: 1/21/93
Appearances: Kate Moss, Todd Oldham

RISE OF THE SUPERMODEL: KATE MOSS

Kate Moss’s arrival on the scene marks the fashion industry’s response to the grunge movement that dominated youth culture and music at the time. The doe-eyed British waif was notable not only because she was antithetical to the buxom, bodacious, big-haired glamour of the supermodels who came before, but because she stood at just 5’6”—a height that was widely considered undesirable in her line of work. The notable thing about Kate (and, of course, the passage of time and her relevance throughout the next decades would prove as much) is that she did not pave the way for a generation of shorter girls: Kate Moss was the exception and an outlier. Another effect of her stature within the industry is that she couldn’t typically be shot for campaigns and fashion editorial flanked by a pack of other girls. In any iconic “here are all the supermodels” round-up shot by Steven Meisel or the like, Moss would look odd, and was therefore frequently shot by herself, which only contributed to her air of vulnerability and her persona as a loner. The CK One group shot ads are obviously the exception, though it should be considered how stark the campaign is and how much the other models featured therein are similarly waifish and un-modelly.

Some argue that Kate Moss does not qualify as a supermodel (and the debate as to who coined the phrase and whether it stretches back far enough to include Lauren Hutton, or extends forward to members of later generations, like Gisele Bündchen still rages) but if you define the term based on money earned, status achieved, and impact, Kate absolutely qualifies. Her ascension represents a critical turning point and redefined ’90s beauty. She is the line between grunge and glamour. In this introductory segment, Kate smiles goofily, talks about how her shoulders are her best feature and how she didn’t get to hang out with Mark Wahlberg during the CK jeans shoot because his "posse" was there the entire time. She is also one of the few fledgling models who does not seem intimidated by any other models, established or otherwise.

+ WATCH KATE MOSS

DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: TODD OLDHAM TAKES US THRIFT SHOPPING

todd oldham thrift store

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham goes thrift store shopping in 1993.
Photo: MTV

As with the furniture in the earlier installment, Todd’s attitude is irreverent and inventive toward the clothes he thinks teens should be wearing. It’s reassuring once again that a world-renowned designer is giving kids the greenlight to shun brands and expensive gear; at one point, Todd even says that thrift-store finds could be considered analogous to couture because time has guaranteed that they’re one-of-a-kind. Todd suggests starting in the department that is your favorite, and looking for signs like empty hangers to see what others have “stashed” on the floor directly underneath. For the ladies, he suggests shopping in the men’s and little boys’ department and advises dudes to “paper bag” their pants and opt for a much larger waist size than they’d typically wear. A quick tutorial on “how to layer,” and why you shouldn’t be afraid to buy suits and discard the undesirable top or bottom ends the segment—but not before Todd instructs us to do our own alterations: Nobody cares if you screw up your own inexpensive stuff.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM GOES THRIFT SHOPPING

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: GRUNGE ON THE RUNWAY

runway chanel

Highlights from the Spring 1993 runway shows.
Photo: MTV

The ’70s look is still going strong, with platforms, wedges, berets, crochet dusters, bell bottoms and hot pants. But there's a notable migration into grunge with beanies, loose jackets, Dr. Martens boots, teeny-tiny eyebrows and stripes aplenty. There is slouchy sleepwear at Perry Ellis by Marc Jacobs (SUCH A PIVOTAL COLLECTION!!!), straggly lank hair at Calvin Klein. Millinery is all over the place from gigantic velvet “Blossom” hats to a straw pith helmet contraption at Byron Lars that is highly evocative of the black “Darth Vader” visor shown for 2012 by Nicolas Ghesqueire for Balenciaga that retailed for a cool $3,000. Details, people, details.

+ WATCH SPRING '93 RUNWAY WRAP-UP

+ WATCH MODELS RELAX BACKSTAGE

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 19

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , ,

todd oldham

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham makes charitable Valentine's Day gifts in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Season: 5 Episode: 20
Title: Romance Edition
Original Airdate: 2/11/93
Appearances: Todd Oldham, Dave Pirner (Soul Asylum), Christian Slater, Naomi Campbell, Lucie de la Falaise, Kristen McMenamy, Anna Sui, Veronica Webb, Kevin Nealon

DEMOCRATIZING FASHION: TODD OLDHAM'S INEXPENSIVE AND SOCIALLY AWARE VALENTINE'S GIFTS

Todd Oldham wasn’t just about arts and crafts and baggy trousers; the designer was passionate about promoting a message. In this Valentine’s Day segment, he instructs us to make mixtapes and beaded flowers for our friends and loved ones—but not before giving love to his favorite charity, Paws and Powers, which helps homebound people with AIDS to keep and care for their pets. He makes a point of namedropping artist Patrick O’Connell for creating the iconic AIDS red ribbon, and advises us not to let a day go by without "honoring our sweethearts with AIDS." It’s a beautiful moment in a feature that could have skewed perfunctory and commercial and yet another reminder to MTV viewers to think of the thousands who died of the virus each year nationwide.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM'S VALENTINE'S GIFTS

POP CULTURE AND FASHION: STARS RECALL THEIR FIRST KISSES

naomi campbell

Model Naomi Campbell shares her first kiss story in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Dave Pirner (Soul Asylum [who was dating Winona Ryder at the time]), Rosie Perez, Dave Mustaine of Megadeth, Christian Slater, Richand and Chris Robinson (the Black Crowes), Naomi Campbell, Lucie de la Falaise, Kristen McMenamy, Anna Sui, Veronica Webb and actor Kevin Nealon talk about how awkward, uncomfortable and awesome their first kisses were. "I accidentally kissed a girl in the eye," remembers Nealon. "I think she got a stye after that."

+ WATCH CELEBS' FIRST KISSES

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 20

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , ,

eve salvail

Bald model Eve Salvail in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Season: 5 Episode: 22
Title: Swimsuit Edition
Original Airdate: 5/12/93
Appearances: Eve Salvail, Todd Oldham

RISE OF THE MODELS, THE NEXT GENERATION: EVE SALVAIL

If you’re unfamiliar with the name Eve Salvail, then perhaps you’ll remember her as that one model with the dragon tattoo on her shaved head. (The original girl with a dragon tattoo, so to speak.) Eve was living in a tiny, rural town in Mantane, Quebec when she was discovered at age 18 and brought into the high-fashion scene by Jean Paul Gaultier. In this segment, Eve plays up her goth appeal in a giant, white, poet blouse and countless candles, and speaks in French or heavily-accented English about her passion for art: “Instead of killing people, I draw.” Cool. She obviously enjoys her macabre appearance, often treating coats and cardigans like capes on the runway. Gaultier admires the duality of her beauty, describing it as a mix of romantic and violent, and there is definitely something arresting about Eve’s bald head atop a bright Chanel suit, just as it is transfixing to watch her features soften when she’s wearing the oversized, menswear-inspired fashions of the early ’90s. It’s this unique quality that makes Eve fantastic for music videos and stylized movies. As such, you’ll find her brandishing her teeth frequently as a Nosferatu-ish vampire in the video for Lenny Kravitz’s “Is There Any Love In Your Heart,” and bit parts in The Fifth Element and Zoolander. Eve had been growing her hair out to a platinum buzzcut for several years following her retirement from modeling, but she returned to the runway—complete with a shaved head and exposed tattoo—for Jean Paul Gaultier’s 2011/2012 Couture show, and for his Fall/Winter 2011/2012 Ready-To-Wear collection.

+ WATCH EVE SALVAIL


DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: HOW TO PICK A SWIMSUIT

todd oldham

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham gives swimsuit pointers at an 'ELLE' magazine photo shoot in 1993.
Photo: MTV

At Liberace’s house (LOL), Todd Oldham styles a swimsuit shoot for ELLEmagazine, and while the editorial features, lean, leggy ladies with outrageous, brightly-colored wigs, Todd takes the time to advise us regular girls on how to buy a flattering swimsuit. He also shares little styling tricks for taking better photos, like taping girls’ boobs together and clamping suits in for a tighter fit; his demeanor on-set is just as casual and personable as in his thrifting segments. Todd highlights the difference between a fashion shoot and real life while picking out details like halter straps for a bustier girl, or selecting a high-cut leg to elongate and slenderize the thigh. He even gets silly remarking on whether or not he accidentally spat onto the camera lens, and humanizes models by drawing attention to foam cutlets that pad their physiques. One model mentions how much she dislikes her back, due to a birth mark which Todd promptly calls shapely and cute. Todd informs us that having to try on 30-40 suits before finding the right one is absolutely normal; that we should be patient and kind to ourselves; and that it’s a hot attitude that makes one look fierce in a swimsuit. It’s another PSA with a light touch, courtesy of the wonderful Todd Oldham.

WATCH TODD OLDHAM'S SWIMSUIT SHOOT

STREET STYLE: COOLEST SHOES OF THE SUMMER

pumas

Puma Clydes (as popularized by the Beastie Boys) were one of the coolest shoes for summer in 1993.
Photo: MTV

What’s in for the summer of ’93? Everything from gingham kitten-heel mules to platform sneakers. There’s a huge emphasis on Puma Clydes (as popularized by the Beastie Boys, as well as student platform clog heels that are very much back in style over 20 years later.

WATCH SUMMER SHOES

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 22

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , ,

cindy crawford onyx

Cindy Crawford goes grocery shopping with Sticky Fingaz, Big DS and Suave of Onyx in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Season: 5 Episode: 25
Title: Back To School Edition
Original Airdate: 8/18/93
Appearances: Big DS, Sticky Fingaz and Suavé (Onyx), Todd Oldham, Carol Shaw

MUSIC AND FASHION: CINDY GOES GROCERY SHOPPING WITH ONYX

Cindy and a Fredro Starr-less Onyx go grocery shopping at a health food store. This is a segment created to educate college kids about nutrition so that they can avoid gaining the 15-20 pounds that we all inevitably gain that first year because class feels entirely optional and eating a chimichanga at 4 AM seemed like a good idea at the time. There are interstitials, with nutritionist Jennifer Stack, advising us against believing claims made on the front of pre-packaged food, and advising viewers to refer to the side panel for concrete nutritional information. Stack also suggests eating dry cereal as a snack, and seeking out pre-washed, pre-cut vegetables. It’s all pretty straightforward and ’90s. So, like, circa when everybody ate carbs.

Cindy and Onyx eat Fig Newtons because they have zero fat (ahem: despite the sugar content). At one point, Sticky Fingaz mentions that the store’s Corn Flakes and Cheerios are fake: They’re the small-box organic kind called “Oatios” that you often see at stores that feature juice bars. On that topic, Cindy drags Suavé, Sticky and the late Big DS to try shots of wheatgrass juice. Despite all the health benefits, the three pass on doing the shot and fake Cindy out, who drinks hers. While I understand that the segment is designed to appeal to college-aged teens by touting a healthy message from their favorite rappers, the piece feels disjointed. These guys could care less about fondling gourds at the health food store. The highlight is when Cindy blots Sticky Fingaz’s T-zone. It’s very stage mom in the best way.

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD SHOPS WITH ONYX

DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: WHITE SHIRTS

white shirts chanel

White shirts on the runway at Chanel in 1993.
Photo: MTV

Fall 1993 is just like every other season since time immemorial in that white shirts are a big deal. These white shirts feature hints of the ’60s and ’70s: billowing, off-the-shoulder poet blouses with exaggerated, pointy collars that harken back to polyester leisure suits. French cuffs were also huge, as was layered suiting. This was a season for white shirts with vests; and suit-weight, sleeveless dresses with thick straps worn over them. We run the gamut from tunic-length tops with belts and a harlequin shirt from Dolce & Gabbana that features a massive Elizabethan ruff (on the lovely Kate Moss) from the other collection they design, Complice. We see offerings from Byron Lars, Rifat Ozbek, Atsuro Tayamo, Chanel, and Todd Oldham: They’re accessible and easy to mimic, and the key here is understanding how each shirt is styled and how the different silhouettes and design features are accentuated to create a high-fashion twist on a staple.

+ WATCH WHITE SHIRTS

DEMOCRATIZING SYLE: A BACK TO SCHOOL WARDROBE FOR $1.98

todd oldham

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham makes accessories for less than $1.98 in 1993.
Photo: MTV

It’s both laudable and laughable that House of Style gave Todd a budget of $2.00 to remix a fall wardrobe. It’s sort of like Rachael’s Ray’s “40 Dollars a Day,” in which she barely leaves a tip and never, EVER has a cocktail, because the $1.98 does not include things like whole sweaters, boots, and a hacksaw. What it does include is a slew of Sharpies, embroidery thread, beets (yup, like the kind for borscht) and a great deal of pluck and adorable ingenuity.

This particular “Todd Time” feels like we’re playing a practical joke on him, and to his credit, he creates some fascinating fashion and does lay groundwork for some ideas that you can apply to pretty much any item of clothing. There is a patchwork sweater created out of 5 other sweaters (that this fits the $1.98 budget is totally lol); given how huge patchwork was as a trend in the ’90s, it’s not a bad idea. Cutting up ill-fitting or moth-eaten sweaters in large pieces (the key being to cut an entire chest section and part of an armscye so that you don’t actually have to construct a sweater out of small swatches) and sewing them together in a large, looping, visible stitches creates a sort of frankensweater that you can at the very least guarantee no one else will have. An errant piece with arms makes a giant, floppy beanie that sort of looks like those tie-top Triple 5 Soul hats. A hacksaw applied to a pair of boots creates a rather "bless-its-heart" looking, peep-toe-boot-flip-flop situation, and bisected beets dye pink polka dots onto an old striped button-down. Sharpie squiggles finish off the look, and the whole thing is plunged into salted water for the vegetable dye to set. A backpack gets zipper pulls made out of twigs. For your efforts, the end result evokes a very crafty hobo.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM ACCESSORIES

DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: BACK TO SCHOOL MAKEUP

carol shaw

Makeup artist Carol Shaw demonstrates back-to-school makeup tips in 1993.
Photo: MTV

The entire back-to-school episode feels very much like a teen magazine except that here we get to see real professionals bringing the lessons to life with moving images. Makeup artist Carol Shaw holds our hand and walks us through a series of small, manageable info nuggets on how to apply different cosmetics. Carol is also the founder of the makeup company Lorac (“Carol” backwards) that’s still popular today, but her tips are wholly product agnostic.

Carol suggests fragrance-free products, and instructs us on how to bend the wand of a new tube of Maybelline Great Lash so that you can pile it on with more accuracy. She also advises us to smile while applying blush so that we know where it goes; she recommends light coverage on foundation because in that case (unlike mascara), less is more. She tells us that moisturizer, cleanser and toner are all you need for a skin-care regimen, as most of us already know. The one thing she teaches that’s a true boon is how to use foundation to lighten lipstick colors, and how to use the back of your hand like a painter’s mixing palette to create the hue you want. This way you can create an entire gradient of browns, peaches, pinks and reds from a single tube. Definitely handy advice for a college kid on a budget.

+ WATCH CAROL SHAW MAKEUP TIPS

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 25

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , , , , ,

cindy crawford jon stewart

Cindy Crawford with MTV Correspondent Jon Stewart and Director of Elite Model Management Ann Veltri in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 29
Title: Winter Edition
Original Airdate: 2/9/94
Appearances: Jon Stewart, Todd Oldham, Sybil Buck

POP CULTURE AND FASHION: JON STEWART AND CINDY HANG OUT

Before he was the silver fox host of The Daily Show, Jon Stewart was a big deal at MTV, helming his own eponymous talk show from 1993-1994. His time slot pitted him against late-night stalwarts like Leno and Letterman, so his run ended up being short-lived. Which is a huge shame because the show was critical for two reasons. One, it featured musical guests who at the time could not otherwise get the shine: Marilyn Manson, Sunny Day Real Estate, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Slayer and Biggie. Another thing is that the producer of The Jon Stewart Show, Madeleine Smithberg, would go on to create The Daily Show, which has of course seen an extraordinary, award-winning run, with Stewart at the helm since Craig Kilborn peaced in the late ’90s.

In this clip, we see Jon shadowing Cindy on her errands, to comedic effect. He cracks everybody up, but it’s sorta sadface because it’s like watching some poor bastard get “friend zoned” by a hot chick who just wants a smart, funny dude to tag along behind her like some neutered lapdog. They visit Cindy’s modeling agency, Elite, where they go through Cindy’s schedule with her agent and clown around. Jon’s recognized by some of the agency’s new faces, and gets to briefly man a casting couch. The floppy-haired comic then accompanies the model to her mani/pedi appointment at Stephen Knoll. He remarks upon how absurd it is that women sit around “pruning each other” while having his feet massaged and his hands moisturized, and then they hit the gym for Cindy’s workout with trainer Radu. Medicine ball sit-ups and basketball end the day; with Jon smoking cigarettes during his crunches.

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD AND JON STEWART

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: HIGHS AND LOWS OF SPRING ’94

runway spring 94

The highs and lows of the Spring '94 runway shows.
Photo: MTV

On the runways of Chloe, Byron Lars, Chanel, Vivienne Westwood, Anna Sui, Marcel Marongiv, John Galliano, and Thierry Mugler, several trends are in raging for dominance. Underwear as outerwear, as seen in prior seasons, is still going strong, this time with long, spaghetti-strapped slips worn as dresses. Hair is piled high, curled and festooned with trails of ribbons. Anna Sui dominates the grunge baby doll scene with A-line mini-dresses with large collars on androgynous model (and Angelina Jolie ex) Jenny Shimizu, as well as on male models. Another male model, Donovan, does the robot on the runway in a metallic suit (also at Sui). And the late INXS frontman Michael Hutchence walks hand-in-hand with his girlfriend, Helena Christensen at Thierry Mugler. Hutchence has a large silver spike through his nose, and Christensen wears a leather bustier dress covered in spikes and fringe.

The best show is John Galliano’s (discussed at length in an earlier episode). The worst, in my personal opinion, is a rare misstep from Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel. The clownishly exaggerated “hip-hop-inspired” knee shorts with suspenders are unflattering, with a voyeuristic petting-zoo philosophy that borders on racism. The hair is vexing as well: Meant to evoke natural hair that has been poorly relaxed, it just looks bedraggled and messy.

+ WATCH '94 SPRING RUNWAY SHOWS

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: TODD TEACHES US HOW TO LAYER

todd oldham

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham makes layers look cool in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Todd Oldham is a godsend. Here, he teaches us a classic “from the runway to the real world” lesson in layering, starting out with an idea from his own show. For the runway, Todd paired a cropped crochet sweater over a long, patterned georgette shirt; for an alternate version, he advises us to shop in the kid’s section of The Gap for a tiny sweater vest to wear over any filmy shirt. Next up is a nod to the Comme Des Garçons trick of putting a fitted, thin, crew-neck, long-sleeved sweater over a suit jacket or blazer to reveal the large patch pockets of the jacket that now billows out slightly at the waist.

At Rifat Ozbek, a bra is worn over a mock turtleneck to showcase “underlayering” — putting what you’d typically wear underneath over your outside clothes. A prime example of this is to put a tank top over a long-sleeved shirt. Mixing seasons is another way to rethink layers, like wearing a summer dress over a sweater or a white cotton peasant blouse over a thick wool turtleneck. It’s more instruction on how to style things you already own, using cues from your favorite designers. Todd’s cheat sheet is all about understanding proportion, a keen sense of color and a hefty dose of attitude.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM ON LAYERING

MODELS, THE NEXT GENERATION: SIBYL BUCK

sibyl buck

Model Sibyl Buck in 1994.
Photo: MTV

In many ways, Sibyl Buck epitomizes the lifestyle aspects of the grunge movement. Kate Moss and Amber Valletta evoke a type of stylized grunge or “fashion grunge,” with their pale skin, doe eyes and seemingly meek dispositions. The critical difference is that they were also both versatile in a way that made them aesthetically malleable depending on the job or designer.

Sibyl Buck, with her septum piercing and dreadlocked red hair, was often hired for her specific look. During a tour of her apartment, we go through her music collection; she cites The Melvins and Bad Brains as favorites. Some headbanging takes place before she shows off her overalls collection; then we’re taken up to her roof to watch her skateboard. She is very much a tomboy — all elbows and knees — and she notes that her clients hate how often she shows up for jobs with scabs all over her legs. Sibyl quit modeling in 1998 to focus on a music career: She currently plays bass for The Lonely Astronauts.

+ WATCH SIBYL BUCK

STREET STYLE: SNOWBOARDERS

snowboard style

Snowboarder style on the slopes in 1994.
Photo: MTV

In 1994, long before it was an Olympic sport, snowboarding was still very much defined as an alternative to skiing. The aesthetic, as such, was a sharp departure from neon, preppy, matching outfits, and much more closely aligned with skate clothing of the era. The jackets were oversized and the pants were “phat” (true story) to allow for layering and warmth. The really interesting part of this segment is how far technology has come since snowboarding grew as an industry. Back then, the larger clothing allowed for higher mobility, whereas contemporary textile technology allows for four-way stretch in waterproof, shell-covered fleece that’s infinitely less cumbersome and less reliant on layers.

The snowboarding kids of almost 20 years ago employ an admirable degree of DIY ingenuity to combat such functional shortcomings. They saw off the top of soft boots for added movement, layer boots, wear several mitts or “hot pads” together keep their hands warm, some layers even looking like they’re covered in duct tape. In 1994, snowboarders were still the “pirates of the mountain,” and the long-haired kids freezing their asses off definitely show a great deal of commitment.

+ WATCH SNOWBOARD STYLE

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 29

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

ayako kawahara

Japanese model Ayako Kawahara in 1994.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 30
Title: Japan Edition
Original Airdate: 3/10/94
Appearances: Ali Larter, Ayako Kawahara

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: MODELING IN JAPAN

By this point in the run of House of Style, we’ve learned a great deal about what it’s like to be a model in America or Europe. Here, we learn what it takes to be a model in Japan. In the second Japanese episode of House of Style, we talk to the most famous Japanese model of the time: Ayako Kawahara. Ayako won a Japanese fashion magazine’s modeling contest at 16, and went on to walk in shows in Paris and Milan. Being a model in Japan may not be considered a dishonorable profession by the time this segment aired, but even in the ’90s, people who earned money in unconventional ways were still regarded with some suspicion, and considered outsiders. On that note, despite many domestic magazines rarely being seen outside the country, a lot of the covers were still dominated by the Western ideal of beauty, primarily featuring American or European models, and employing Asian models only for ancillary roles.

We’re told that there’s a burgeoning movement to increase visibility for Asian women, so that they can become fashion leaders without mimicking a Western look. That said, in 1994 a white model could make anywhere from $30,000-$60,000 on a 6-week stint in Japan, and we meet such a model: 17-year-old Ali Larter. At her shoot, Larter is highly stylized and fussily dressed; her blonde hair is tidily pulled back, and she wears a series of knee-length, girly suits. Ali is asked to remove her bright red lipstick for its conspicuousness, and to keep her legs closed at the knees so as to appear more modest. She notes that the most significant difference between working at home as opposed to Japan is that American models are instructed to act normal, whereas in Japan her poses are intended to be unnatural, with no sense of irony. She looks like a well-behaved doll.

+ WATCH MODELING IN JAPAN

STREET STYLE: HARAJUKU

harajuku fashion

Street fashion in the Harajuku section of Tokyo, Japan in 1994.
Photo: MTV

House of Style hits up the Harajuku neighborhood once again, but this time our camera simply roves the clothes of passersby, sans interviews. It used to be that looks by designers like Jean Paul Gaultier and Vivienne Westwood dominated youth culture, but style has balkanized into smaller sub-groups. There are oversized bubble goose jackets and baggy jeans; animal print; poet shirts; vertically striped pants; girls dressed to look like schoolgirls; real schoolgirls; printed body suits; floor-length jackets; matching couples; platform sneakers; and one impressive yet upsetting occurrence of UGG boots well before that trend took off in America.

+ WATCH HARAJUKU STYLE

MUSIC AND FASHION: REGGAE IN JAPAN

japanese reggae

The Japanese reggae hip hop scene in 1994.
Photo: MTV

You may be familiar with “ganguro,” which calls attention to over-tanned girls in white eye makeup and bleached hair employing a sort of “black face,” with offshoots like the “yamanba” trend, incorporating Hawaiian accessories like leis (thank you Internet!). In this segment, however, we visit the Japanese reggae underground, and interview teens in slouchy hats and Rastafari gear in basement clubs. Scenesters use darkening lotions and log time at the tanning salon to achieve a darker skin tone, and for $300-$400, devotees spend up to 10 hours at a hair salon getting their pin-straight hair dreadlocked. There’s a conflict between valuing Japanese Orientalism and feeling oppressed by the country’s conservatism, and a harmonious example of the more racially accepting tenor of this music scene is that Japan’s best-known reggae artist, PJ, is half Japanese and half African-American. The most popular Japanese reggae artist is Nahki, the co-creator of the first Japanese reggae festival Japansplash. Nahki lived in New York in 1988, as a contributor to Reggae magazine, and released his first album, Baddest Japanese, in 1990. The kids make the interesting observation that theirs is a new generation that listens to reggae and hip-hop, whereas rock-and-roll captured the hearts and minds of the generation before.

POP CULTURE AND FASHION: TODD OLDHAM TEACHES RICKI LAKE HOW TO PACK

In this clip Todd Oldham helps Ricki Lake deliver a baby at home. JKJKJK. He helps her pack a weekender using tricks like rolling t-shirts to prevent wrinklage. It's science and it's handy.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM PACKS WITH RICKI LAKE

+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 30

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , ,

cindy crawford tracey ullman

Cindy Crawford plays dress-up with comedian Tracey Ullman at The Plaza Hotel in New York City in 1990.
Photo: MTV

Season: 6 Episode: 32
Title: Fifth Anniversary Special
Original Airdate: 7/19/94
Includes segments from:

  • Cindy Crawford And Tracey Ullman Play Dress Up (Episode 5)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Cindy Crawford's Vogue Shoot With Helmut Newton In Monte Carlo (Episode 10)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Calvin Klein's Advertising Campaign (Episode 10)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Linda Evangelista Model Profile (Episode 12)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Todd Oldham Refurbishes On A Budget (Episode 16)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • How To Pluck Your Eyebrows (Episode 18)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Kate Moss Model Profile (Episode 19)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Eve Salvail Model Profile (Episode 22)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Carol Shaw's Makeup Tips (Episode 25)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Cindy Crawford's Italian Vogue Shoot With Max Vadukul (Episode 27)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • Amber Valletta Model Profile (Episode 27)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

cindy crawford

Cindy Crawford interviews photographer Gilles Bensimon at a photo shoot for 'Elle' magazine in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 37
Title: Romance Edition
Original Airdate: 2/14/95
Appearances: Gilles Bensimon, Bridget Hall, Morris Lapidus, Zoe Cassavetes, Adam Horovitz, Luscious Jackson, Toure

DEMYSTIFYING THE FASHION INDUSTRY: CINDY INTERVIEWS BRIDGET HALL, GILLES BENSIMON

By now, Cindy is a pro journo. While interviewing Bridget Hall, our host totally calls the young model out on being a hypocrite for telling girls to stay in school, since Bridget dropped out to make money. That's when things get real and they both bro down to talk about how grueling the job is.

With former Elle Magazine creative director and current America's Next Top Model photographer, Gilles Bensimon, Cindy is similarly about her business. She asks him how much control he exerts on set. He bristles at "control," explaining that his shoots are a collaborative experience and a group effort. Gilles maps out all of the looks beforehand, hiring a fit model to try on the outfits, which he then sketches to figure out if he likes the ensemble or not. This is an interesting contrast to the way Stephen Sprouse, Ellen Von Unwerth and Helmut Newton shoot.

Cindy has shot with Gilles for Elle covers before, and despite Gilles’s self-consciousness around our cameras, Cindy remarks that Gilles genuinely loves women. He looks slightly offended, as if she’s just called him pervy, but he's quickly disarmed. It’s nice to see Cindy so relaxed. Her hair is soft, she’s wearing a pastel cashmere tee with jeans, and she seems comfortable in her role as reporter. Gilles was formerly married to Elle MacPherson, but reality TV viewers may recognize him as the ex-husband to Kelly Killoren of The Real Housewives of New York City.

+ WATCH CINDY CRAWFORD INTERVIEWS GILLES BENSIMON


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: TODD TIME WITH MORRIS LAPIDUS

todd oldham morris lapidus

Designer and 'House of Style' correspondent Todd Oldham interviews architect Morris Lapidus in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Todd continues to interview people who inspire him creatively. For this segment, he speaks to architect Morris Lapidus about his contributions to the South Beach skyline of Miami Beach. Morris, who studied architecture at Columbia, designed the Le Fountainbleu and the Eden Roc. His aesthetic has been called modern and post-modern, but for our purposes, that means swooping, curved lines, whimsical details and an exacting sense of humor. With Fountainbleu, he went “hog wild,” creating a giant curve to eschew the notion that buildings had to be rectangular.

Morris and Todd walk around Morris’s properties to pluck out details — like the bowtie pattern on floor tiles (a hat tip to Morris’s sartorial particularities), and how he hates certain patches of wallpaper for covering what was previously a beautiful mural. We already know how interior design influences Todd’s fashion designs, so it makes sense that Todd would want to talk to creators from this disciplines. Morris, who passed away in 2001, was a riot. He says he got rid of his generation's critics by outliving them, and cuts his own interview by telling us to stop rolling.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM TALKS ARCHITECTURE


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: ZOE CASSAVETES AND ADAM HOROVITZ GO VALENTINE'S DAY SHOPPING FOR IONE SKYE

adam horovitz

Adam Horovitz of the Beastie Boys goes Valentine's Day shopping for his wife Ione Skye in 1995.
Photo: MTV

As a kid, I thought it was awesome that Adam Horovitz was married to actress Ione Skye. Not only was it an example of two cultural worlds colliding (music and acting), it was awesome that two cool people in large cities felt compelled to marry so young. I thought it was SO romantic (less so now, ahem...). Ione, who you’ll also recognize as a model in the X-Girl show, seems chill, and the fact that Adam is unworried about what to get her for Valentine’s Day in this clip with Zoe Cassavetes is sort of fantastic. Everyone is being normal and relatable.

Zoe, at this point of the series, is our “youth culture correspondent,” and her IRL friendship with Adam makes a trip to Frederick’s of Hollywood for lingerie infinitely less awkward or annoyingly sexxxy. A sheer white marabou-feather-trimmed bed jacket and a black, vinyl trench coat (that you can totally tell Zoe's going to go back for) are considered too racy, so they swan off to a candy store.

There will be no heart-shaped Russell Stover box for Ione. Instead, they go to a bulk candy joint and go nuts with scoopfuls of jelly beans, chocolates, a Ring pop and an Astro pop. Then there’s a quick stop into a photo printing store, where Adam gets an I Dream Of Jeannie-themed picture of himself on a mirror, and his shopping is complete. The experience is low-fi and there's nothing that Adam bought that any college or high school kid couldn’t afford. It's too bad Ione bought him a diamond-encrusted Ducati Desmosedici RR superbike! JK. She didn't do that. Especially since he sold his gold helmet to buy her the mirror.

+ WATCH V-DAY SHOPPING WITH ADAM HOROVITZ


MUSIC AND FASHION: LUSCIOUS JACKSON GOES SHOPPING

luscious jackson

Luscious Jackson and Theo Kogan of the Lunachicks at Perfidia's Hair World in New York City in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Luscious Jackson was an all-female group signed to the Beasties’ label Grand Royal. You may remember “Naked Eye,” the first single from their second album, Fever In Fever Out. Or “Here,” on the Clueless soundtrack. They disbanded only to reunite in 2011. This segment was filmed a full two years before they would hit it big in the Billboard charts in 1997, and it’s cool to see the ladies in their hometown of New York, and finding out what stores they frequent.

It’s awesome to get to see the original Perfidia’s Hair World in Patricia Field’s former location on 8th Street. The musicians are outfitted with enormous, stylized pieces: a look for a retro stewardess, rainbow layers, Wynonna Judd hair. You may recognize the aplomb and potential for humor when you realize that Perfidia of Perfidia’s Hair World was also responsible for Jerri Blank’s hair on the Amy Sedaris TV show Strangers With Candy. So classic.

We then run into the incomparable Theo Kogan of Lunachicks (and now Theo and The Skyscrapers), who looks sensational in massive strappy platform heels and socks, a tiny black and white dress, enormous red hair, and a head band that features wire bunny ears that predates Marc Jacobs’s bunny ears for Louis Vuitton, which Madonna famously wore at the 2009 Met Gala.

The group then goes thrift shopping at Housing Works, a charity shop that benefits homeless people in New York living with HIV and AIDS. The girls buy cardigans and puffy ski jackets that express their love of orange and beige. Then it’s a surprising trip to Brooks Brothers, where they pick up mixed-pattern shirts and clashing, hyper-preppy argyle sweaters, because menswear lasts longer and is often cheaper than comparable ladies’ clothes. It’s a lesson in perspective; counter-culture clothing can sometimes just be mainstream stuff flipped on its head.

+ WATCH LUSCIOUS JACKSON GOES SHOPPING


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: AROMATHERAPY IS EN VOGUE

toure

Massage and aromatherapy with TV personality and novelist Touré in 1995.
Photo: MTV

This is a Valentine’s Day themed package on essential oils, but it’s also a reminder of how aromatherapy dominated the marketplace in the mid-‘90s. There wasn’t a gift shop in the world that didn’t sell a diffuser, and we all suddenly knew about the effects of sandalwood and what ylang ylang was. Admittedly, part of the reason why I wanted to share this footage is that it includes a very young Touré.

The Rolling Stone contributor, novelist and TV pop culture pundit learns about acupressure and reflexology from the comfort of a bathrobe and speaks in soothing tones as he is massaged in the cover of candlelight. It’s all very ’90s, back when we thought alternative therapies and not standing desks would SAVE OUR LIVES.

+ WATCH AROMATHERAPY


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: SOFIA COPPOLA LAUNCHES MILKFED

sofia coppola

Sofia Coppola at the fashion show for her clothing line Milkfed in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Did you know that Milkfed was still being sold in Japan? No idea what the hell a Milkfed even is? Back in 1994, before she was an Oscar-winning director, Sofia launched a clothing brand. She started out with logo and graphic tees (you'll see a SUPER early version of the Che Geuvara joint in our footage) and I recall being especially fond of their tanks because there were super flattering at the arm and didn't give you armpit fat even if you were wearing the wrong bra.

Milkfed also made cut-and-sew items like A-line minis and simple pinafores and even if Sofia talks about her designing shortcomings (she does NOT consider herself a designer), this ex-Chanel intern definitely knows her audience. All of her clothes were affordable without being mainstream, like, the GAP and she simply made clothes that she and her friends liked that couldn't be found in stores. Boom.

+ WATCH SOFIA COPPOLA


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 37

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

walk like a runway model

A participant walks like a runway model at a New Jersey mall in 1992.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 41
Title: Best Of Edition (How-To Tutorials)
Original Airdate: 6/6/95
Includes segments from:

  • How To Walk Like A Runway Model (Episode 13)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • How To Accessorize For $1.98 (Episode 25)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

  • How To Relax With Aromatherapy (Episode 37)
  • VIDEO | PHOTO

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , ,

las vegas showgirls

Makeup tips from Las Vegas showgirls in 1995.
Photo: MTV

Season: 7 Episode: 44
Title: Las Vegas Edition
Original Airdate: 11/27/95
Appearances: Las Vegas showgirls

DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: MAKEUP TIPS FROM SHOWGIRLS

With regard to beauty, there are two schools of thought amongst Vegas showgirls: eyebrows or no eyebrows. In this segment, we visit Las Vegas and go backstage to reveal makeup secrets of showgirls. None of them is applicable to real life (back in 1995 or now) unless you’re giving showgirl realness as a very well-blended drag queen, but it’s fascinating to see the tricks and shortcuts applied to a faceful of powders, creams and colors. Some girls swear by removing their brows because they like to vary the shape and color according to the mood required in the show. An arch denotes anger or tempestuousness, while a rounder curve indicates that the character is more subdued. Some even use a red lip pencil as liner on their lids and lips in order to match.

Whether your brows are drawn in or not, makeup time can run anywhere form 20 minutes to over an hour, and the advice varies from not having your eyeliner extend past your brow to having a “mobile mole”: a traveling beauty spot that disguises blemishes. It’s captivating to watch makeup routines that are enacted in the cloistered environment of a Las Vegas show, since they’re totally unrelated to the trends of the time. You may find the painstaking results appealing or garish, but you can’t knock the effort.

+ WATCH SHOWGIRL MAKEUP TIPS


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: LAS VEGAS SPECIALTY BOUTIQUES

At first you'd think this would be a segment that would be more at home on a travel show, especially given the butch, gravelly voiceover but the bit I love is that we visit with Ms. Rita Hart at Quality Liquidators where they sell furniture from closed down hotels and casinos (and please also check out Rita's windbreaker ensemble because it's amazing), Stephen C. Serge, the proprietor of Serge's Showgirl Wigs and Mordechai Yerushalmi a.k.a. Jeweler to the Stars. It's exactly the sort of anthropologically marvelous stuff I'd want to hit up if I visited a touristy spot. Plus, we've got a clip of Marty Scorsese talking watches.

+ WATCH LAS VEGAS HISTORY


DEMOCRATIZING STYLE: TODD GOES TCHOTCHKE SHOPPING

Trust Todd Oldham to hit up Las Vegas in doubled up animal print (python satin shirt and leopard print pants) to shop at the "largest emporium of crap." We look at numerous wedding-themed bauble, every manner of Elvis gee-gaw and a slew of naked lady pens.

+ WATCH TODD OLDHAM SHOP IN LAS VEGAS


DEMYSTIFYING FASHION: THE SPRING '96 RUNWAYS

The middle of the decade showed strong color, pattern, and texture for spring. Neons, lurid burn out patterned velvet, lace, sequins, ostrich feathers, plaids, stripes, and a ton of zebra print. Silhouettes were either mega diaphanous like slinky satin and clingy chiffon or else super structured with denim and khaki showing up in everything from suiting to onesies. Baby tees and halters continued to rage (they'd be big all through the '90s) and navel gazed all the exposed midriffs from Anna Sui to Gaultier and even Chanel. Knee-shorts were hot but hot pants were hotter, but the takeaway might be that white-girl cornrows and dreads were a thing and that's just real :(

+ WATCH SPRING '96 FASHION WEEK SHOWS


+ CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS FROM EPISODE 44

Like us on Facebook so we can be friends and follow us on Twitter @MTVstyle to talk.

Tags , , , , , ,

House Of Style

House Of Style MTV Style House Of Style

About This Blog

MTV Style follows how people express themselves through fashion and beauty, from our favorite pop culture icons to you, the reader. We cover the fun, loud side of the industry with news, trends, interviews, videos, and more — MTV Style is fashion at full volume.

+ E-mail the editors: style@mtv.com
+ Follow us on Twitter:
@MTVstyle

+ Like us on Facebook:
Facebook.com/MTVstyle

+ Find us on Tumblr:
MTVstyle.Tumblr.com

+ Find us on Google+:
+MTVstyle


Editorial Director
Sophia Rai
Staff Editor
Gaby Wilson
West Coast Editor
Chrissy Mahlmeister
Assistant Editor
Maeve Keirans
Editorial Assistant
Jessie Peterson

Featured Comment

I love these two as a couple. What a festive way to celebrate two important events in their life. Mariah looks like a dream.

Posted by Journey on Mariah Carey And Nick Cannon Shut Down Disneyland To Renew Vows In Cinderella-Themed Ensembles
©2014 Viacom International Inc. All Rights Reserved. MTV and all related titles and logos are trademarks of Viacom International Inc.